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Full text of "The Muse"

<PHE AUSE 





The Class of 1905 




Saint Mary's School Library 



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WE DEDICATE THIS VOLUME TO THE MEMORY OE OUR LATE 
"SCHOOL MOTHER," IN LOVING REMEMBRANCE OP HER LIFE 
AMONG US, AND IN GRATITUDE FOR HER INFLUENCE. 

HERS WAS THE PRECIOUS GIFT OF SYMPATHY— NOT ALONE IN 
JOYS AND SORROWS— BUT IN TRIFLES. THOSE SO-CALLED " LITTLE 
THINGS," THE PETTY PLEASURES AND WORRIES THAT RETURN 
EACH DAY, AND ARE STRONG TO MAKE OR MAR LIFE'S HAPPINESS 



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MRS. THEODORE DuBOSE BRATTON 



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5 



September 15 
November 1 
November 24 
December 22- 
January 5 
January 19- 
January 26 
February 22 
March g 



-Advent Term began. 
-All Saints'; Founder's Day ; a holiday 
-Thanksgiving Day; a holiday. 
-Christmas holidays begin. 
-Classes resumed at 8:45 A. M. 
-Lee's birthday; half-holiday. 
-Easter Term begins. 
-Washington's birthday; half -holiday 
-Ash Wednesday ; a holy day. 



April 


16- 


ay. April 


21- 


April 


2 3" 


May 


21- 


May 


22 


May 


2 3 


May 


n- 


iv. May- 


24- 


May 


25- 



-Palm Sunday; Bishop's visitation. 

-Good Friday; a holy day. 

-Easter Day. 

-Commencement Sermon. 

-Concert. 

-Class Day. 

-Meeting of Alumnae Association. 

-Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

-Graduation Exercises. 





■'-1$? 



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Jfcopiny to find a we/come 

Jrom friends both otd and new, 

75 h 9 " 77/ use" extends its greeting 
uo you, and you, and you. 



Boardl of Truasttees 



Tlfoe Bsslhopi 

Rt. Rev. J. B. Cheshire, D. D., Raleigh, N. C. Rt. Rev. Ellison Capers, D. D . Columbia, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. A. A. Watson, D. D., Wilmington, N. C. Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner, D. D., Asheville, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Robert Strange, D. D., Wilmington, N. C. 

CS©2°acsiIl auadl ILsvy Trustees 



Rev. F. J. Murdoch, D. D. 

Rev. Julian E. Ingle 
Rev. M. M. Marshall, D. D. 

Rev. Robert Draxe, D. D. 



Rev. E. N. Joyxer 

Rev. H. H. Phelps 

Rev. F. J. Murdoch, D. D. 
Charles E. Johnson 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Richard H. Battle, LL. D. 

Charles E. Johnson 

EAST CAROLINA 

Rev. T. M. N. George 

Col. John W. Atkinson 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Rev. W. P. Witsell 

ASHEVILLE 

Rev. T. C Wetmore 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Rt. Rev. J. B. Cheshire, D. D. 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 
Dr. K. P. Battle, Jr. 



W. A. Erwin 
Dr. R. H. Lewis 

David Y. Cooper 

Frank Wood 



H. P. Duval 

Col. T. F. Davidson 

Dr. R. H. Lewis 
W. A. Erwin 



>t. Mary's AlrannsB Association 



ORGANIZED MAY, 1879 

Mrs. Mary Iredell, President 

Mrs M. T, Leak ] 

Mrs. I. M. Pittenger 1 

y Vice-Presidents 
Mrs. F. P. Tucker 1 

Mrs. Kate de R. Meares J 

Miss Kate McKimmon, Secretary 




AAISS LAXTON 



A\ISS HULL ,„_ 




/AISS CHECKLE.Y 



AMSS FENNER 



AVSS /*V=KIWAOM 



AMSS CHITTENDEN 



Fao&Htty aimd Officers 



Rev. McNeely DuBose, B. D Rector Mrs. McNeely DuBose .... School Mother 



Rev. McNeely DuBose, B. D., Ethics and Bible 

Elleneen E. Checkley, History 
Ernest Cruikshank, A. M. (Washington College, Md.), Latin and Science 
Wtlliam E. Stone, A. B. (Harvard), English and Literature 

Kate C. Shipp, English and Literature 

Margaret M. Jones, Mathematics 

Marie M. Gerber, French 

Beatrice Balfour, Elocution and Physical Culture 

Edith R. Chittenden, A. B. (Smith College), German 

Kate McKimmon .... Principal Harriet E Bowes Assistant 



Clara I. Fenner (The Maryland Institute, School of Art and Design) 

Ml^asic ID>©paspftfflmeia& 

W. H. Sanborn, Director, Organ and Piano, Theory Chelian H. Pixley, Piano 

Martha A. Dowd, Piano Mrs. W. H. Sanborn, Vocal 

Kate M, Laxton, Piano Gertrude Sanborn, Assistant Vocal 

Charlotte K. Hull, Violin 

Lizzie Lee, Principal Juliet B. Sutton, Assistant 

ftia&si ©ir^arfteia 
Louise T. Busbee 

Elleneen E. Checkley, Librarian Mrs. G. W. Seay, Housekeeper 

Carrie Cowles, Inspector Lola E. Walton, Matron of Infirmary 

Miss Anne Saunders, Chaperone 




■ L H. 'A' 




Margaret Rosalie DuBose, President Mossie Elizabeth Long, Treasurer 

Dorothy May Hughson, Vice-President Sadie Marcelline Jenkins, Historian 

Anna Barrow Clark, Secretary Ellen Phifer Gibson, Prophet 

Margaret Rosalie DuBose, Poet 
Motto 

Fac et Spera 

Flower 

Red Rose 



Colors 
Maroon and Gray 



14 




Miss Kate McKimmon, V J Raleigh, North Carolina 

"A truer, nobler, trustier heart, 
More loving and more loyal, never beat, 
Within a human breast." 

Our Honorary Member 



15 




Anna Barrow Clark, .•/ K W Scotland Neck, North Carolina 

" The hand that follows intellect can achieve." 

Junior Year 
Altar Guild 
St. Anne's Chapter 
Basket-ball, Beta 
Tennis Club 
HUtorian of Class '05 
Vice-President - A 
Inter-Society Debater 

Senior Year 
Altar Guild 

St. Catherine's Chapter 
Corinthian Athletic Association 
Basket-ball 
Track Team 

Treasurer L'Etoile German Club 
Secretary of Class 
Secretary of - A 
Inter-Society Debater 
Editor-in-Chief Monthly and Annual Muse 




16 



Rena Hoyt Clark, / H - Tarboro, North Carolina 

"She's aye, aye sae blithe, sac gay, 
She's aye sae blithe and cheerie." 




Junior Year 

L'Etoile German Club 
Historian EAIi, '03 
Vice President E A n, '04 
E A n Editor of Peals 
Treasurer of Altar Guild 
Secretary of Class, '05 
St. Elizabeth's Chapter 

Senior Year 

President E A n 

Exchange Editor of Monthly Muse 

Assistant Business Manager of Annual Muse 

L'Etoile German Club 

St. Catherine's Chapter 

Altar Guild 

Corinthian Athletic Association 

Inter-Society Debater 



17 




Margaret Rosalie DuBose, .7 A W Asheville, North Carolina. 

"Quick to learn and wise to know." 

JUNIOR YEAR 

President of Class, '05 

President of St. Catherine's Chapter 

Vice-President of - A '03 

Captain of Tennis C lub, '05 

Junior 1 A Editor of Peals 

Altar Guild 

L'Etoile German Club 

SENIOR YEAR 

President of Class, '05 

Cor. Secretary of 2 A 

St. Catherine's Chapter 

Corinthian Athletic Association 

Tennis Club 

Literary Editor of Monthly and Annual MUSE 

Treasurer of Altar Guild 

L'Etoile German Club 

President of South Carolina Club 




IS 



Ida Pollard Evans, .-/ K ¥ Wilmington, North Carolina 

" Words are given us, half to conceal, half to reveal our thoughts." 

junior year 
Teller of 5 A Literary Society 
Tennis Club 
St. Etheldreda's Chapter 

senior year 
Historian of S A 
T A German Club 

Secretary of St. Catherine's Chapter 

Secretary and Treasurer of Olympian Athletic Association 
Altar Guild 

Associate Editor of Annual Muse 
Social Editor of Monthly Muse 
President Wilmington Club 





19 




Effie Christian Fairley Monroe, North Carolina 

"Mindful not of herself." 

Junior Year 

- A Literary Society 
St. Margaret's Chapter 
Altar Guild 

Senior Year 
Treasurer of St. Catherine's Chapter 
Corinthian Athletic Association 
Altar Guild 
2 A Literary Society 
Associate Editor of Monthly and Annual Muse 



Ellen Phifer Gibson, A* J Concord, North Carolina 



Happy am I, from care I am free, 
Why ain't they all contented like me t" 

JUNIOK YEAR 

2 A Literary Society 

Altar Guild 

St. Anne's Chapter 

Tennis Tournament Contestant, '05 

Basket-ball, Alpha 

T A German Club 

SENIOR YEAR 

2 A Literary Society 

Altar Guild 

St. Catherine's Chapter 

Captain Corinthian Athletic Association 

Art Editor of Annual Muse 

Dramatic Club 

Tennis Club 

Track Team 

Vice-President of T A ; German Club 

Class Prophet 

Inter-Society Debater 

Advertisement Editor of Monthly and Annual Muse 






Florence Lawton Grant Wilmington, North Carolina 

" 'Jupiter! how cheerful are my spirits." 

junior Year 
2 A Literary Society 
Altar Guild 
St. P^theldreda's Chapter 

SENIOR YEAR 

2 A Literary Society 

T A German Club 

President of St. Catherine's Chapter 

Altar Guild 

Treasurer of Wilmington Club 

Corinthian Athletic Association 

Associate Editor of Monthly and Annual Muse. 




Dorothy May Hughson, }' J East Orange, New Jersey 

" Courage is the chief component of character." 



Junior Year 
St. Monica's Chapter 
Altar Guild 
Tennis Club 
~ A Literary Society 

Senior Year 
St. Catherine's Chapter 
Altar Guild 

Corinthian Athletic Association 
Assistant Manager of Track Team 
Tennis Club 
Critic of 2 A 
Dramatic Club. 
Tau Delta German Club 

Advertisement Editor of Monthly and Annual Muse 
Art Editor of Muse 
Vice-President of Class 





23 




Sadie Marcellike Jenkins, )' -J ... Edisto Island, South Carolina 

" Her voice was ever soft, 
Gentle, and low, — an excellent thing in woman." 

Junior Year 
President of St. Monica's Chapter 

Vice-President of Class '05 
2 A Literary Society 
Altar Guild 
Tennis C ub 

Basket-ball, Alpha 

Senior Year 

President of Altar Guild 

Historian of Class 

Treasurer of ^ A 

Secretary of South Carolina Club 

St. Catheiine's Chapter 

Secretary and Treasurer of Corinthian Athletic Association 

Literary Editor of Monthly and Annual Musk 




Bessie Poe Law Raleigh, North Carolina 

"My heart is as true as steel." 



JUNIOR YEAR 

E A n, Literary Society 

SENIOR YEAR 





E A n, Literary Society 
City Editor of Muse 




Mossie Elizabeth Long Rockingham, North Carolina 

"Laugh and be jat, sir, your penance is known; 
They that love mirth, let them heartily drink, 
'Tis the only receipt to make sorrow sink." 

JUNIOR YEAR 

E A n, Literary Society 
St. Etheldreda's Chapter 
Altar Guild 

SENIOR YEAR 

Treasurer of Class 

Corresponding Secretary of E A II 

Altar Guild 

St. Catherine's Chapter 

Olympian Athletic Association 

Tennis Team 

Associate Editor of Monthly and Annual Muse 




?5 



Mary Ellis Rosseli., f ft 1' Staten Island, New York 

11 A spirit pure as hers, 
Is pure, even while it errs." 

Junior Year 
2 A Literary Society 
Basket-ball; Beta 
Tennis Club 
St. Etheldreda's Chapter 

Senior Year 
President of 2 A 

Secretary of L'Etoile German Club 
Corinthian Athletic Association 
Captain of Track Team 
St. Catherine's Chapter 
Altar Guild 

Business Manager of Monthly and Annual Muse. 
Basket-ball 
Tennis Club 





27 




Malinda Ray Tillixghast Morganton, North Carolina 

" SJic attracts mc daily wiili her gentle virtues." 

JUNIOR YEAR 

1 A Literary Society 

SENIOR YEAR 

£ A Literary Society 
Vice-President of Altar Guild 
St. Catherine's Chapter 
Associate Editor of Muse 
Corinthian Athletic Association 



28 



Class History 



^/F it is true that " life is made up of ever so many 
^1 partings welded together," our Class of '05 has 
*~J had an ample foretaste of what is to come. 
Starting out as Freshmen, numbering thirty members, 
we entered with almost all the old girls and fifteen or 
so new ones into our Sophomore year ; but here came 
the first, though trivial changes, that of the colors from 
red and grey to maroon and grey, and of the flower 
from morning-glory to red rose. Our Sophomore 
Class was the last to study Vergil under Miss Alice 
Jones, and the first and only one to undergo the brain- 
racking trials of Minto, and worst of all, we, as Sopho- 
mores, left St. Mary's with the sad realization that the 
Brattons would not be there when we returned. 

The Junior year opened with twenty-one girls in 
Class, chiefly new, with several new teachers, and our 
new rector, whom, in our humble way, we tried to help, 
and for whom we soon felt a deep admiration and 
affection. We viewed with open-eyed astonishment all 
that the " bright Class " of '04 was doing, and wonder- 
ed if we could possibly make ourselves worthy succes- 
sors of it. Towards the last of the year we became 



courageous, and decided to revive the monthly edition 
of the Muse, and publish it during our Senior year. 
On commencement day, we parted half-gladly, half- 
sadly with the irresponsibility of being under-classmen, 
and wholly sad was our parting with the Class of '04, 
with Miss Thomas, and with the old chapel. 

Truly the fates seemed against us when, in Sep- 
tember, 1904, we returned to find our Class numbering 
thirteen. Only two of us had been here as Freshmen. 
Up to this time the Class had been composed of new 
girls almost every year, and there had been little or no 
Class feeling, and the members of '05 had been, com- 
paratively speaking, strangers to each other. But, one 
of our girls being a day-scholar, the remaining twelve 
of us exactly fitted into Senior Hall, and this -being all 
on the same floor, has given us a pleasant, friendly 
intercourse, which we could not have had two or three 
years back when the Seniors stayed in different build- 
ings. Then every month, anxiety over the " little 
Muse " has given us a common bond of sympathy, and 
now there is no lack of Class feeling, and unity, and 
friendship. 



29 



The spring of our graduation has come — we can not 
say " at last " because so few of us have been here over 
two years ; we are the first Class to graduate in the en- 
larged chapel, and somehow we are glad that the dear 
little altar is still in the chancel though it does look a 
trifle lonely. All our partings with old, and makings 



of new friends, have made it hard for us to be all that 
a Senior Class at St. Mary's should be, but we have 
had two constant friends to help us through the four 
years— two friends, steadfast and unchanged, and 
those are our honorary member, " Miss Katie," and 
our motto — " Fac ct Spera." 

Historian. 




30 




I 



§L ill 



p n c n n-^g^i 





Tfine Class Prophecy 



^"^■EMININE curiosity, alas, is immortal! It dares 
^fi manifest itself even in that dim home of the 
*" shades where the fearful Styx flows. 

A certain, distinguished-looking shade lately de- 
scended from the land of the living to a small settle- 
ment along the banks of that far-famed river, caused 
quite a flutter of indignation among its inhabitants be- 
cause of her apparent desire to hold herself aloof from 
them. When she issued invitations to a reception to 
which the fatal number of thirteen were bidden, her 



name not being given, society was in despair of find- 
ing out the cause of this mysterious gathering. 

When the day of the momentous event arrived, it 
was with many a curious glance that the assembled 
guests viewed each other, and great was their sur- 
prise when no one was introduced, as nearly all were 
strangers. However, greater surprise was to come. 
When the hostess, who had been delayed, appeared, a 
placid shade in the back of the room suddenly arose, 
and casting her eves earthward, exclaimed in a most 



3i 



sentimental tone of voice, " Oh, Margaret, can it be 
you?" Immediately the whole room echoed and re- 
echoed with exclamation upon exclamation. " Why, 
Mossie, what on earth did you do to yourself?" 
" Dorothy, my love," " Oh, Ellen," and the Damon and 
Pythias of the Class were in each other's arms. "Anna 
and Mamie, too." " Oh, dear! " etc. 

Finally the hostess rapped sharply on her desk for 
order, and when everything was sufficiently quiet, be- 
gan to speak, " By this time I suppose, you have all 
recognized each other, and know that this is a reunion 
of the Class of '05. Now, first, of course, we must call 
the roll and as I do, please each one give an account of 
her career on earth since we parted at dear old St. 
Alary 's." 

After a few tears had been shed and order again re- 
stored, the President began, " Anna Clark." At this 
name a portly, dignified shade, attired in men's clothes 
arose and said, " I am, indeed, sure that it is unneces- 
sary to acquaint you with the facts of my famous 
career, but, nevertheless I shall do so, for you know, as 
Mr. Stone used to say. ' The only way to learn a thing 
well is to go over it again and again.' Well, after 
leaving school, finding that love was a mere mockery, I 
became interested in politics, and when, in 1920, the 
law of Woman's Rights was passed, I went to the 
United States Senate, and for many years distinguished 
myself and my State in that august body, and died in 
1940, a much loved and lamented citizen." 



She sat down, followed by the admiring eyes of the 
whole assembly, and " Miss Rena Clark " was called. 
" Well, as for meh," she began, " I was a famous es- 
sayist, and though please do not mention that I said so, 
to that illustrious shade, if you should see him, I made 
Macaulay himself totter on his pedestal. A bust of 
meh rests in Westminster Abbey." 

The President herself then arose, " Well, girls — I 
beg your pardon, for alas ! we are girls no longer — at 
the height of my fame and success as a violinist I gave 
it all up and went as a missionary to the far heathen, 
who, ungrateful creatures, not being able to appreciate 
my greatness, ate me up." Being overcome with grief 
she ceased. 

" Miss Ida Evans," " Xow all I mean to say " — and 
being told by the President to be as brief as possible she 
began again, " I came out in society, moved in the best 
circles, was a belle in New York and Washington, and 
finally, after rejecting numerous proposals, married, 
alas ! not one of the best families, but a self-made man. 
for whose death the cruel, unfeeling world blamed me. 
saying I talked him to death. Isn't that perfectly out- 
rageous ?" No one seemed to disagree with the world and 
the roll-call continued, " Miss Effie Fairley." At this a 
tall shade arose, and some one remarked, " She looks 
like herself." " I had a very happy and prosperous 
life. I married early, a young Englishman who owned 
a chewing-gum factory, and was quite noted through- 
out my life for my generosity in giving that delightful 



article to my friends." This recalled so vividly the 
old days that all forgot their surroundings and were 
back at St. Mary's, and so when "Miss Gibson" was 
called, from force of habit, she answering "late," no 
one noticed and the roll-call went on without pause to 
the next name. "Miss Florence Grant." Ah, my fate 
was indeed a sad one, but you know the good always 
die young. I died a few weeks after leaving school, 
from the effects of nervous prostration, brought on by 
my arduous studying in my Senior year." So numer- 
ous were the exclamations of astonishment and horror 
occasioned by this mournful recital that the " Miss 
Hughson " of the President could scarcely be heard. 
A tall, intense-looking shade arose, and with chin ex- 
tended began in a high, strained voice, " I went on the 
stage, and one night when at the zenith of my career 
and when the adoring world lay at my feet, I appeared 
in my famous death-scene of ' Romeo and Juliet.' Be- 
ing absolutely lost in my acting, at the critical moment 
— I just forgot and really died." All were dissolved in 
tears when " Miss Jenkins " was called. She began, 
" Oh, girls, I had such a happv life. I fell deeply in 
love after leaving school and married a widower — such 
a dear good man, and our life was one long, happy, 
rose-strewn path." This simple story of a peaceful life 
restored the assembly to its former serenity. " Miss 
Law." " For several years after my departure from 
St. Mary's, I was the reigning belle of Raleigh and 



certain parts of \ irginia, but becoming bored by the 
world's admiration and flattery, I cast it all aside to 
become a nun. In a few years I became Mother Su- 
perior at my dear old Alma Mater, now, as you know, 
a convent. I think I can truthfully say that I brought 
many erring young hearts back to the fold." 

If she had not mentioned her name I fear no one 
would have recognized our Bessie in the sad, sanctified- 
looking shade who spoke thus. 

" Miss Long." When she arose there was a distinct 
gasp of surprise. Could that tall, slender shade really 
be the same Mossie of the days of yore ? "I should be 
very happy, I suppose, for I have become what I so 
longed to be, but alas ! I am not. Such is human 
nature ! I took a post-graduate course in chemistry at 
St. Mary's and spent my whole life long (too true) in 
service to suffering humanity by discovering and per- 
fecting a medicine to reduce flesh. But, ah ! I did my 
work so well, that one day, taking an overdose, I 
vanished in midair and am now the pitiful figure you 
behold before you." 

Many indeed were the heart-breaking sighs that 
followed this shade's sad story, for all recollected the 
happy ever-laughing Mossie of years gone by. 

" Miss Rossell." All heaved a sigh of relief. Here 
at least was one upon whom time had made no im- 
pression. She was the same Mamie of '05 except per- 
haps a little stouter. " I married an army officer and 



33 



brought undying fame to myself and to him by success- 
fully managing to make him head of the United States 
Army." 

" Miss Tillinghast," being called, a meek sweet- 
faced aged shade stood up and with her knitting still 
in her hand, began to speak. " I had the misfortune to 
be the last, the thirteenth of the Class and so, sad to 
relate never married, but spent my life knitting and 
visiting the poor and needy, a useful, if not a brilliant 



career. I am sure my lover, who died in his youth, and 
left me to solitary old maidenhood would have had it 
so." With a sweet smile of resignation she resumed 
her seat and knitting. 

The President arose to say something, but a bell rang 
violently and Charon's relentless voice was beard to 
call out, " The last trip down the Styx this evening," 
and all rushed pell-mell to the landing as if they had 
never been the dignified Seniors of 'oi. 




(Blnss |Inrm 

While we count the swift-flying moments, 

So brimful of duties and joys, 
And of all the hurry of school life, 

Come these words thro' the unceasing noise : 
"Do and hope." 

When we gaze on all the dear faces, 

And our very hearts grow sore 
With the sorrow of life's first partings, 

We hear the same words once more : 
"Do and hope." 

Then since there is work for the present, 

Let us do it with all our will, 
And while bright life calls us onward, 

Let us trust and hope until — 
With the world's short day behind us, 

We come to the light above, 
And loosed from the ties that bind us, 

Find fulfilled in the one word, love, 
Oar motto : "Do and hope." 



35 



JuEiniior Clas 



Flower Colors 

Pansy Dark Blue and Old Gold 

Motto 
Milites bonam militam 



Frances Elizabeth Woolf President 

Ruth Foster Sec'y and Treasurer 

Gertrude Sullivan Historian 

Virginia Bailey Josephine Boylax 

Ruth Foster Jane Iredell Green 

Amy Perry Fitz-Simons Annie Koonce 

Mary Lassiter Margaret Mackay 

Olive Morrill Harriet Ruff 

Annie Sloan Gertrude Sullivan 

Frances E. Woolf 



36 



JUNIOR CLASS 



^©plhoinmore O&ss 



Flower Colors 

Cornflower Dark Blue and White 

Officers 

Grace Buxton Whitaker President 

Emily J. Carrisox Vice-President 

Sue Brent Prince Secretary 



Helen Ball Katie Barbee 

Heber Birdsong Bland Bowen 

Emily Garrison Beatrice Cohen 

Lilian Farmer Eula Gregory 

Jessie Harris Alice McCullers 

Mary Perry Sue Prince 

Ella Simmons Blanche Thomson 

Grace Whitaker 



3§ 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Freshman O&ss 



Motto 
Step by step we gain the height 



Flower 

Black-eyed Susan 



ces°s 



Colors 
Black and Gold 



Emma Barnwell, President 

Helen Strange, Vice-President 

Alice Davis, Secretary 



Mary Alexander 
Hannah Ashe 
Emma Barnwell 
Katie Coke 
Genevieve Cooper 
Juliet Crews 
Bessie Ivey 



Alice Davis 
Cornie Fairley 
Nellie Fort 
Ida Foster 

CoRINNA GaNT 

Katie Gary 



Florence Kidder 
Frances Lee 

Mattie Lumsden 
Gilmer Mitchell 
Ada Purcelle 
Frankie Self 



Lottie Sharpe 
Miss Checkley, Honorary Member 



Marguerite Short 
Blandina Springs 
Alice Stack 
Helen Strange 

Pearl Washington 
Elizabeth Watts 
Maria Webb 



40 




FRESHMAN CLASS 




Albright, Elizabeth 
Allen, Margaret 

Bainbridge, Constance 
Bledsoe, Elizabeth 
Cabaniss, Mary 

Chapman, Jessie 
Clark, Isabel 
Coke, Katie 
Croft, Ella 

Davis, Rubie 

Emerson, Elise 



Glazebrook, Kate 
Gray, Bessie 
Hane, May 
Hartge, Leata 
Hay, Nannie 
Hudson, Cecil 
Hutchings, Julia 
Jones, Jessie 
Joyner, Lula Lee 
Lee, Jennie 
Loane, Katie 
42 



Harriot, Mary 
Norris, Ruby 
Pearson, Nancy 
Peterson, Mary 

Robbins, Saidee 
Simmons, Isabel 
Simpson, Evelyn 
Wells, Annie 

Whitaker, Amelia 
Wiggins, Elizabeth 
Woodward, Cecil 



ittrrarp ^octettes 







-^ 
















Motto 
Where high thoughts are duty 

Colors 

Old Rose and Sage 

Flower 

Wild Rose 



I 



44 




EPSILON ALPHA PI LITERARY SOCIETY 



Epsilon Alpha PI ILitter&iry Society 

Officers 

Advent Term Easter Term 

Rena Hoyt Clark President Rena Hoyt Clark 

Bettie Woolf Vice-President Gertrude Sullivan 

Margaret Elmer George Secretary Margaret Elmer George 

Mossie Elizabeth Long Corresponding Secretary Mossie Elizabeth Long 

Gertrude Sullivan Treasurer Virginia Kyser 

Minna Hampton Critic Bettie Woolf 

Mary Hinsdale Slocomb Historian Blanche Thomson 

Isabel Means Ruff Teller Harriet Webster 

Annie Sloan Teller Pattie Barden 



Barden, Pattie George, Elmer Long, Mossie Slocomb, Mary 

Barnwell, Emma Hampton, Minna McCullers, Alice Sloan, Annie 

Callum, Alice Hampton Catherine McGeehee, Aleathia Sullivan, Gertrude 

Clark, Rena Johnson, Fanny Morrill, Olive Thomson, Blanche 

Farmer, Lilian Koonce, Annie Richards, Christine Thomson, Catherine 

Foster, Ruth Kyser, Virginia Ruff, Isabel Webster, Harriet 

Edmunston, Nora Law, Bessie Poe Savage, Lily Wilcox, Mamie 

Gray, Caro Sharpe, Lottie Woolf, Bettie 

Inloiffioipaipy Mcemmfoers 

Miss Lee Miss Gerber Bishop T. D. Bratton Miss Balfour Miss Walton 

Miss Hull Miss Kate McKimmon Miss Chittenden 
For a pupil to be eligible to this society, it is necessary to make an average of 90 per cent, on her studies. 

47 




Colors 
Purple and Gray 



48 




SIGMA LAMBDA LITERARY SOCIETY 



>ig£ma Lassabei Literary Society 



Advent Term Easter Term 

Mary Ellis Rossell President Mary Ellis Rossell 

Jennie Atkinson Murchison Vice-President Jennie Atkinson Murchison 

Anna Barrow Clark Secretary Anna Barrow Clark 

Margaret Rosalie DuBose Corresponding Secretary Margaret Rosalie DuBose 

Sadie Marcelline Jenkins Treasurer Sadie Marcelline Jenkins 

Dorothy May Hughson Critic Dorothy May Hughson 

Ida Pollard Evans Historian Ida Pollard Evans 

Senah Critz Senior Teller Virgilia Argyle Glazebrook 

Grace Buxton Whitaker Junior Teller Gertrude Winston 



Ashe, Hannah 
Bailey, Serena 
Bailey, Virginia 
Bowen, Bland 
Broadfoot, Frances 
Boylan, Josephine 
Bynum, Susan 
Carrison, Emily 
Carter, Susie 



Carson, Jean 
Clark, Anna 
Clark, Helen 
Crews, Juliet 
Critz, Senah 
Cunningham, Eda 
Davis, Alice 
Drewry, Emmie 
DuBose, Margaret 



Durham, Nellie 
Eldredge, Margaret 
Evans, Ida 
Fairley, Effie 
Fitz-Simons, Amy 
Gaither, Elizabeth 
Gary, Kate 
Gibson, Ellen 
Glazebrook, Virgilia 



Gray, Bessie 
Grant, Florence 
Green, Jane Iredell 
Gregory, Eula 
Hardie, Kate 
Higgs, Emily 
Hughson, Dorothy 
Hunter, Mattie 
Ivey, Bessie 



51 



Saint Mary's School Library 



Jenkins, Sadie 
Kidder, Florence 
Lee, Frances 
Mackay, Margaret 
Miller, Virginia 
Moore, Mary Ella 



Miss Bowen 
Miss Cowles 
Miss Checkley 
Miss Dowd 
Mr. DuBose 



Murchison, Jennie 
Prince, Sue 
Robinson, Mary 
Rossell, Mary 
Seay, Leonore 
Simmons, Ella 



Short, Marguerite 
Slocum, Dorothy 
Springs, Blandixa 
Springs, Marguerite 
Spruill, Alice Winston 
Stedman, Margaret 



Winslow, Kate 



• Inloiaorsiipy Meinmlbers 



Mrs. DuBose 
Miss Fenner 
Miss Jones 
Miss Pixley 
Miss Laxton 



Mr. Sanborn 
Mrs. Sanborn 
Miss Saunders 
Miss Shipp 
Miss Sutton 



Strange, Helen 
Tili.inghast, Linda 
Yillepigue, Mary 
Walker, Marguerite 
Webb, Maria 
Whitaker, Grace 



Mr. Stone 
Mrs. Seay 
Dr. Anderson 
Mrs. Anderson 




5^ 



ifi'iae h 



ALPHA KAPPA PSI 



Alplia ffiappa Psi 

Founded and Chartered at St. Mary's, igoo Alpha Chapter, St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

Nationalized, 1904 Beta Chapter, Virginia Female Institute, Staunton, Va. 

Colors 
Blue and Gold 

Flower 
Forget-me-not 



Josephine Bowen Mrs. J. E. Jeudwixe Carrie Helen Moore Nannie Smith 

Minnie Burgwyn Magdalen Marshall Margaretta Pringle Miss E. W. Thomas 

Lilian Clark Esther Means Lucy Taylor Redwood Mae Wood Winslow 

Cornelia Colemax Harriet Meares Hallie Robertson Marie Bruxson Wilco x 

Lewis Coffin Martha Moffet Mary Allan Short Susan Wood 

Bolling Hubard 

Glhapteir S.oil 9 H9©4=H9G5 

SORORES IN ACADEMIA 

Virginia Bailey Margaret Eldredge Florence Kidder Mary Yillepigue 

Anna Clark Ida Evans Mary Ella Moore Grace Whitaker 

Senah Critz Amy Fitz-Simons Jennie Murchison Kate Winslow 

Margaret DuBose Yirgilia Glazebrook Helen Strange Mattie Hunter 

SORORES IN FACTJLTATE SORORES IN URBE 

Miss Checkley Margaret Stedman 

Miss Bowex Jennie Trapier 

56 



fflrfTOS 




GAMMA BETA SIGMA 



Gamms* Belta *Sfi^siiia 




FOUNDED 1901. CHARTERED 1904. 

Flower 

Violet 



Colors 

Purple and Gold 



Jean Moore Carson 

Helen Haywood Clark 
Rena Hoyt Clark 

Margaret Elmer George 
Jane Iredell Green 
Mary Leigh Robinson 

Mary Ellis Rossell 

Sara Gertrude Sullivan 
Miss L. H. Lee 



58 



\J« o/gUaxt-A^-^*^ .VV^W- 













J 



Happa Delta 



Founded 



1897 



Chartered 

ere 



1902 



Alpha Virginia State Normal, Farmville, Va. 

Beta Chatham Institute, Chatham, Va. 

Gamma Hollins Institute, Hollins, Va. 

Delta College for Women, Columbia, S. C. 

Theta Randolph-Macon Woman's College, Lynchburg, Va. 

Sigma Gunston Institute, Washington, D. C. 

Phi Phi Fairmont Seminary, Washington, D. C. 

Zeta University of Alabama.Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Phi Delta St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

Kappa Alpha Florida State College, Tallahassee, Fla. 

Rho Omega Phi Judson College, Marion, Ala. 



PM Delta CfeapHesp 

SOROR IN FACULTATE 

Charlotte Kendall Hull 

SORORES IN ACADEMIA 



Josephine Engelhard Boylan Sue Brent Prince Blandina Baxter Springs 

Emma Louise Drewry Lottie Sharpe Frances Elizabeth Woolf 

Ellen Phifer Gibson Alice Winston Spruill Maria Hill Webb 

Mary Christine Klingensmith Marguerite Clarkson Springs Gertrude Horner Winston 

59 




Upsilom Delta 



Founded 1902. Chartered 1904. 

Emma Elliot Barnwell Sumter, S. C. 

Susan Forney Bynum Lincolnton, N. C. 

Emily Jordan Garrison Camden, S. C. 

Susannah Emerson Carter Asheville, N. C. 

Florence Ella Croft Aiken, S. C. 

Miss Martha Arrincton Dowd Raleigh, N. C. 

Nora Lawton Edmonaston Savannah, Ga. 

Lilian Hauser Farmer Florence, S. C. 

Dorothy May Hughson East Orange, N. J. 

Sadie Marcelline Jenkins Edisto Island, S. C. 

Mary Thornton Lassiter Hertford, N. C. 

Miss Kate McKimmon Raleigh, N. C, 



60 




UPSILON DELTA 




QERMAN 












CLUB 5 


G©s=ffim§&E&s 1904=1905 

Tau Delta Fall German November $ 

L'Etoile Christmas German December 10 

Tau Delta Colonial Ball March 6 

L'Etoile Morning German Mav 24 



63 



IL'ELtoiifie Germaum Oualb RoEl 



Colors : Black and Gold 



Senah Critz President 

Alice Winston Spruill Vice-President 

Mary Ellis Rossell Secretary 

Anna Barrow Clark Treasurer 

Mary Ella Moore Leader 



Susie Carter Margaret DuBose Mattie Hunter Alice Spruill 

Jean Carson Emmie Drewry Jessie Harris Leonore Seay 

Anna Clark Ei.ise Emerson Mary Ella Moore Marguerite Short 

Helen Clark Nora Edmondston Mary Rossell Gertrude Sullivan 

Rena Clark Margaret Eldredge Isabel Ruff Grace Whitaker 

Senah Critz Amy Fitz-Simons Margaret Stedman Kate Winslow 

Eda Cunningham Jane Iredell Green 



64 



Colors 

Gray and Gold 

Officers 

Jennie Atkinson Murchison President 

Ellen Phifer Gibson Vice-President 

Mary Robinson Secretary 

Marguerite Springs ■ ■ ■ Treasurer 

Virgilia Argyle Glazebrook Leader 



Miss Hull Dayis. Alice Hughson, Dorothy Springs, Marguerite 

Albright, Bessie Evans, Ida Klingensmith, Christine Thorn, Dorothy 

Bailey, Virginia George, Elmer Murchison, Jennie Strange, Helen 

Barnwell, Emma Gibson, Ellen Prince, Sue Yillepigue, Mary 

Boylan, Josephine Grant, Florence Robinson, Mary Walker, Marguerite 

Bynum, Susan Glazebrook, Kate Slocomb, Mary Winston, Gertrude 

Croft, Ella Glazebrook, Virgilia Slocum, Dorothy Woolf, Bettie 

Kidder, Florence Springs, Blandina 



64 




TAU DELTA GERMAN CLUB 



T 



L 




Mary Robinson . . , 
Gertrude Sullivan 
Christine Richards 



President 

Vice-President 

. . Secretary and Treasurer 



Roll 



Jean Carson 
Susie Carter 
Josephine Boylan 
Ellen Gibson 
Minna Hampton 



Dorothy Hughson 
Mary Ella Moore 
Mary Robinson 
Christine Richards 
Gertrude Sullivan 



6S 




DRAMATIC CLUB 




a 









V/t a-t "W>e j'oliy »/ttd»# Scl" 
P- >» t to... d»i»M and fiai'iiT ij«ub«r 

i 



aj i 



J g A Ah f -"4- ' IP Wwjlu Wl.v.,4 To d/«« ab>t«7f 

|*(k*Af. f^^- § ^;: ? :;,.:r:;;\::;r:,';i;; t ; 






-* (5. hl.„ ft,,,,, „.|, 3 ,j^ , „■ t 7: y, rJk 

I a ~* k — J»- ^j.»h~ ; r. «*.■*, a^ 

5 " •> «■«».»,.« v „ <„,,-T), 




Corlinifdhiiaiini Roll II 



Ellen Gibson, President 
Archbell, Anne 
Bainbridge, Constance 
Barden, Pattie 
Boylan, Josephine 
Cabaniss, Mary 
Carter, Susie 
Chapman, Jessie 
Clark, Anna 
Clark, Rena 
Clark, Isabel 
Cooper, Genevieve 
Cunningham, Eda 
Durham, Nellie 
Du Bose, Margaret 
Eldredge, Margaret 
Ellenwood, Ethel 
Fairley, Epfie 
Fairlf.y, Cornie 
Foster, Ruth 
Ga.nt, Corinna 
Gary, Kate 



George, Elmer 
Gibson, Ellen 
Grant, Florence 
Gray, Bessie 
Green, Jane I. 
Gregory, Eula 
Hamptox, Minna 
Haxe, May 
Hardie, Kate 
Hughson, Dorothy 
Jenkins, Sadie 
Kidder, Florence 
Lee, Frances 
Lassiter, Mary 
Long, Mossie 
Liddell, Helen 
McCullers, Alice 
Miller, Virginia 
Morrill, Olive 
Murchison, Jennie 
McCraw, Madge 



Sadie Jenkins, Secretary and Treasurer 
Pearson. Nancy 
Prince, Sue 
Perry, Mary 
Rosseil, Mary 
Ruff, Harriet 
Sanborn, Margaret 
Seay. Leonore 
Self, Frankie 
Sloan, Axxie 
Springs, Marguerite 
Springs, Blandina 
Strange, Helen 
Sharpe, Lottie 
Tillinghast, Linda 
Thorn, Selma 
Walker, Marguerite 
Washington, Pearl 
Watts, Courtney 
Watts, Elizabeth 
Wiggins, Elizabeth 
Winston, Gertrude 



SIC 



Jean Carson, Presv 
Albright, Bessie 
Alex ande r.Mary 
Miss Balfour 
Baknwell. Emma 
Bainbridge, Constance 
Bailey, Serena 
Bailey, Virginia 
Bowen, Bland 
Brig man, Mattie 
Croft, Ella 
Cohen, Beatrice 
Clark, Helen 
Critz, Senah 
Drewry, Emmie 
Davis, ALice 



lent 

Emerson, Elise 
Evans, Ida 
Fairley, Nancy 
Farmer, Lilian 
Carrison, Emily 
Foster, Ida 
Glazebrook, Virgilia 
Glazebrook, Kate 
Gaitiier, Elizabeth 
Harris, Jessie 
Hunter, Mattie 
Miss Jones 
Joyner, Lula Lee 
Klingensmith, Christine 
Kyser, Virginia 



Ida Evans, 

Long, Mossie 
Lee, Rowena 
Lamb, Annie 
Loane, Katib 
Hampton, Catherine 
Moore, Mary Ella 
Marriott, Mary 
Miller, Anne 
Pearson, Ada 
Ruff, Isabel 
Robinson, Mary 
Short, Marguerite 
Sullivan, Gertrude 
Spruill, Alice Winsto 
Savage, Lily 



Secretary and Treasurer 
Stack, Alice 
Simmons, Ella 
Thomson, Blanche 
Thomson, Catherine 
Villepigue, Mary 
woolf, bettie 
Winslow. Kate 
Whitaker, Grace 
Webb, Maria 
Washington, Pearl 
Wells, Annie 
Bynum, Susan 
Edmunston, Nora 

n Simmons, Isabel 
Webster, Harriet 



7J 



Basket-ball 
Elmer George, Captain 
Marguerite Walker 
Josephine Boylan 
Gertrude Winston 
Sue Prince 
Mary Ross ell 
Anna Clark 
Margaret Eldredge 



Basket-ball 
Virgilia Glazebrook, Captain 
Kate Glazebrook 
Mary Villepigue 
Christine Klingensmith 
Alice Winston Spruill 
Jean Carson 
Bettie Woolf 
Marguerite Short 



Goiriiaftlhisua Teamg 

Tennis 

Gertrude Winston, Capt. 
Marguerite Walker 
Florence Kidder 
Sue Prince 
Nancy Pearson 
Margaret DuBose 
Ellen Gibson 



Track 
Mary Rossell, Captain 
Anna Clark 
Ellen Gibson 
Sue Prince 
Florence Kidder 
Bessie Gray 
Gertrude Winston 
Josephine Boylan 
Susie Carter 
Dorothy Hughson 



SiEims 



Tennis 
Mary Ella Moore, Capt. 
Kate Glazebrook 
Marguerite Short 
Mossie Long 
Bessie Albright 
Elise Emerson 
Alice Winston Spruill 



Track 

Alice Winston Spruill, Captain 

Kate Glazebrook 

Ella Croft 

Bland Bow ex 

Lily Savage 

Emma Barnwell 

Elise Emerson 

Gertrude Sullivan 

Virginia Kyser 

Lula Lee Joyner 



76 



Missionary Chapters 



St. Maury © IBsrajaclh of ftlhe Womm&ir& 1> s Auxiliary 

Miss Walton President 

Miss Sutton Vice-President 

Miss Shipp Secretary 

Miss McKimmon Treasurer 

AMgy? Gmaild 

Miss McKimmon Superintendent 

Sadie Jenkins President 

Linda Tillinghast . Vice-President 

Margaret DuBose Treasurer 



Miss Jones Directress 

Florence Grant President 

Ida Evans Secretary 

Effie Fairley Treasurer 

St. EHlheldl2»<edli& i 's Clhspter 

Mrs. DuBose Directress 

Jennie Murchison President 

Bettie Woolf Secretary 

Marguerite Short Treasurer 

77 



Miss Checkley Directress 

Virgilia Glazebrook .•• President 

Elmer George Vice-President 

Mary Robinson Secretary 

Lilian Farmer Treasurer 

St. Moimaes^s Clhmpteir 

Miss McKimmon Directress 

Serena Bailey President 

Helen - Clark Vice-President 

Bland Bowen Secretary 

Marguerite Walker Treasurer 

iSfto Msnpg» supers dha.pfteff' 

Miss Bowen Directress 

Susie Carter President 

Virginia Miller Vice-President 

Eula Gregory Secretary 

Harriet Webster Treasurer 

Miss Sutton Directress 

Virginia Kyser President 

Pattie Barden Vice-President 

Jane I. Green Secretary 

Lottie Sharps Treasurer 



78 



Tfi&e Hospias 



(Norns are the three sisters — Past, Present, and Future- 

I sat on the steps of St. Mary's, 

When the glow of the setting sun 
Blended with night's gray shadows, 

And the winter's day was done. 
When sudden, a thrill went through me, 

For there confronting me 
Were they whom the dark and the storm call forth, 

The silent sisters, three. 



of Norse mythology. Mimir's well is their dwelling-place.) 

The good, the pure, and the faithful, 

Whose influence broad and great 
Is felt throughout the country, 

And remembered in the State. 
Then I turned and faced the Present, 

And saw in her eyes again, 
Reflected the flickering lights and shades 

That come with joy and pain. 



The eldest with eyes clear gleaming 

Like the water in Mimir's well, 
Waved her pale hand o'er the door-step 

And runes from her fingers fell 
Where the stone had been worn by the foot-steps 

Of three-score years and more, 
And I saw the girls of other days 

Pass through St. Mary's door. 



She, drawing nearer to me, 

Reached out and took my hands, 
Urging me forward, forward 

To where her [sister stands. 
And beckons me on and onward, 

A veiled mysterious will ; 
And I pray, and hope, and [tremble and fear, 

But I follow, follow still. A. C. A. 



So 



Wlheire ttlhe Svuleti Sete 



^4* ATE one afternoon a little girl about six years 
AM [ old, stood watching the sun set, and wondering 
*** where that great big ball of light went. She 
had often thought about this before, and had even 
asked her big sister over and over again to tell her 
where the sun went, but she had never yet found out, 
for her sister always said, " Little girls should be seen 
and not heard," and would never tell her. Perhaps it 
was because sister herself did not know. Well, she was 
going to watch it to-day and see if she could see the 
hole open. The sun sank lower, her eyes began to 
hurt, and she saw all sorts of queer colored things 
dancing about, but her mind had been made up, and 
she was not going to let a little matter like that baffle 
her. 

Across the river there was a vessel, where all day 
long men had been taking boards from a lighter and 
putting them into the two great, big holes in the vessel. 
She knew this, for had she not stood by the up-stairs 



window that very afternoon and watched them. Yes, 
and the sun was surely going into one of those same 
holes; she could see that just as plainly as anything. 
But how on earth could it find room in there with all of 
those boards. She thought a minute. Oh, of course, 
she knew now ; those boards were to cover up the holes 
and keep the sun in there all night, then in the morn- 
ing the men would take the boards off in time for the 
sun to come out. 

" There, it is in." The men are putting the covers 
over the holes. She breathed a sigh. " Well, I 'm 
mighty glad 1 've found out at last." 

"Found out what, little girl?" Her father had 
come up behind her and had been watching her for 
some time. 

" Found where the sun goes, papa. I watched it go 
into that hole in the vessel, and now I am going to tell 
sister, 'cause I know she doesn't know." 

R. F., '06. 



81 



TJhaU Dos 



Washington, D. C, March 10. 1905. 

My Darling Jack: The precious dog has at last ar- 
rived, and 1 just can not tell you how perfectly charm- 
ed I am with him. He is a dream of beauty, and has 
such cunning little ways. I think you are the dearest, 
sweetest boy in the world to have taken so much trou- 
ble to get him for me, even though you did not ap- 
prove. In spite of all your prophecies to the contrary, 
I am perfectly positive that I shall not get tired of him, 
or think him a nuisance. Every time I look at him I 
think of you, and you do not know how much company 
he is for me. Do run down soon, and let me thank 
you myself for him. and do not forget to bring the 
collar for him. 

"Sours devotedly, 

Edith. 

Washington, D. C, March 17. 1905. 

Dear Jack: I have been so busy washing the dog 
and apologizing for the mischief that he does that I 
have not had time to write often. 

As you said he would, Fido takes a great deal of 



attention, but you know I can not watch him all the 
time. Yesterday he got out and chewed up Mrs. 
Brown's muff, and though I ate " humble pie " for 
nearly an hour about it, she has not forgiven me yet, 
though I do not see how she can hold me responsible. 

I should have thought that would have satisfied him 
for one day, but last night he got Mr. Courtney's new 
beaver, and carried it out into the street, which, to -say 
the least, was not very good for it. Mr. Courtney did 
not sav much, but he looked volumes, and I thought 
like the Bishop, that it was a very profane silence. 

Every dav Fido reminds me more and more of you, 
and he actually has a little nervous habit of walking 
around the room just exactly as you do. I think he is 
going to wake up now, so I must close. 

Yours, 

Edith. 

March 30, 1905. 
Dear Jack: I have at last gotten rid of that detest- 
able dog. He has made my life a burden, and I am 
nearly a nervous wreck from running after him all 



82 



day, and rocking him all night to keep him from howl- 
ing and arousing the whole house. I am hardly on 
speaking terms with any one here, except the cook, and 
all on account of him. His last crime was carrying 
my best slippers and gloves into the coal cellar. I gave 
him to a peddler yesterday, and hope you will not mind. 



I think I will take a holiday and go home for a week 
or two to rest. Do not try to see me before I go, for I 
don't think I could stand the sight of you just vet. 
You would remind me too much of that dog. 

Edith. 
M. M., oft 




83 



THne Messaa'e ©f ttlhie VioEete 



ILEXTLY, gently the warm wind of spring- 
time scattered the apple blossoms like a min- 
iature snow-storm through the sunny air ; from 
the garden came the scent of violets ; a robin called 
joyously from the wood-lot, while the soft droning 
sound of the busy honey-bee, brought to us the realiza- 
tion that our Southland had once more blossomed into 
life. 

In the door of the comfortable log farmhouse, a 
gaunt mountain woman stood, gazing at all Nature's 
loveliness about her, with unseeing eves. Her hands 
were knotted and worn by years of hard labor and 
there were severe lines of care about the dull eyes and 
firmly-closed mouth. Shading her eyes with one rough 
hand, she rebelliously watched a boy of not more than 
sixteen years, who came slowly up the narrow moun- 
tain highway, drinking in the fresh beauty about him 
and pausing now and then to listen to the countless 
legends of the forest, sung now softly, now louder and 
louder by the voices of the soughing pine trees. 
Tenderly clasping a small bunch of wood violets, the 
boy shrinkinglv approached his mother, " See 



mammy." he said, " don't they jest talk to yer when ye 
look in ther leetle faces? " 

" Wal, now, John King," she exclaimed, rudely tear- 
ing the spring blossoms from his protecting hand. " ye 
may think its smart to go on like that, ye plumb idjit, 
ye never went on so silly till that thai" high-falutin', 
dudish, young college perfesser put all them fool no- 
tions into yer head. Not another word 'bout them 
weeds; thar now, go git to yer day's plowin' ; if ye'd 
talk 'bout pertaters and corn thar'd be a leetle good in 
yer. Git outer my way and don't ye waste no more 
time on sich nonsense." 

With the wounded look of some trusting but hunted 
wild creature in his great blue eyes, the boy almost 
stumbled past his mother, and a few moments later he 
slowly plodded his way to the field, with the air of one 
just convicted of some great crime. All through the 
long, hot, Mav afternoon he dejectedly followed the 
plow, though his slender hands, his intelligent and pale 
face, and frail body showed only too plainly bis unfit- 
ness for such labor. 

Toward sunset Martha King paused several times 



84 



in her supper-getting to gaze up at the fast-darkening 
lane. John was usually home with the cows long be- 
fore this time, and she muttered crossly to herself, 
" He's jest gone chasin' arter weeds agin, the good-fur- 
nothin', leavin' me all the chores f o do." 

Timothy King came wearily in from the wood-lot. 
"Supper ready, ma? " he asked, " Wal, whar's the boy? 
It 's gittin' late and the cows ain't in yit ; p'rhaps I 'd 
better go look 'em up." With slow, plodding, steps, 
the big boots clumped heavily out into the fast-falling 
dusk. 

Eight o'clock came, and Mrs. King still peevishly 
kept up the fire in the stove, almost unwillingly keep- 
ing the supper hot, for her husband and son. Pres- 
ently a heavy step sounded on the piazza outside. 
" Marthy." called a frightened voice, " p'rhaps ver had 
better come out here a minute ; Johnnie's had another 
faintin' spell." 

All through the long night hours the father and 
mother anxiously watched the doctor, who had come 
from the cross-roads, steadily but with difficulty keep- 
ing up the spark of life remaining in the frail body. 
Once in the delirious frenzy of his fever the boy 



murmured feebly, " See, mammy, don't they jest talk 
to yer, when ye look in ther leetle faces? " Like some 
stricken, voiceless creature, wounded too deeply for 
expression, the mother turned from the bedside, and 
left the room. As she entered the little kitchen, her 
rough, nerveless fingers clutched pitifully a handful 
of wood violets, withering on the table ; kneeling there 
in the dim light of the smoky kerosene lamp, she cried 
out in the anguish of her mother's heart, " O God, 
I knowed he wan't strong like other boys, I knowed he 
had sense a plenty, and was a long sight ahead of his 
old pa and ma. Have mercy on me, the wicked, ign'ant 
woman I am, and give me back my boy." 

The old clock wearily ticked away the hours, until 
the grav light, which comes before the dawn, sil- 
houetted the objects in the neat kitchen, against the 
whitewashed walls. Still the mother knelt silently in 
the shadowy darkness, pressing the violets to her cold, 
dry lips, like one in a daze, till the door behind her 
opened softly. " Marthy, Marthy," whispered the 
awed voice of her husband, " Doc says the worst is 
over now and our bov will live." 

H. I. W. 



85 



Wftn&tt ttlhe WatteFinmelomi Told 



fl\^ O one could find out what became of the pieces 
>L\\ of watermelon sent daily to the kitchen for 
*+* Alum Di. Naturally, at first, we thought that 
she ate them herself, but one day Aunt Alattie saw her 
carefully putting her melon, wrapped in newspaper, on 
the kitchen table. 

" Why don't you eat it now. Alum Di? " Aunt Alattie 
asked. 

" Wha foh do vou ask me dat, Missus' Ain't you 
know dat watymillion eber mek me sick, sence de wall ? 
No, Missus, I ain't neber tech million sence de wall." 

Alum Di seemed so hurt at being asked one question, 
that Aunt Mattie decided to ask no more until later, 
and for a week or so the subject of who ate the water- 
melon was a matter of amused discussion in the " Big 
House." Finally, one day while we were at dinner, 
through the open window floated this long, protracted 
call, " Buh Prince, o-o-oh. Bull Prince ! " 

Then we heard the thump of the rake handle as the 
old gardener balanced it against the house, and I went 
out on the back piazza to watch for further develop- 
ments. 



There was Alum Di peering anxiously from the 
kitchen window, and in a minute or so Daddy Prince 
hobbled slowly around the corner of the house. Ashe 
walked across to the kitchen, I wondered how much 
over a hundred years old he must be. At last he 
reached his destination, and with many grunts, he half- 
straightened his old bent body, and extended his arms 
for something that Alum Di was passing down to him. 
Then with a large sigh of relief he slowly sat down on 
a bench under the window, and raised to his lips a piece 
of watermelon. 

This incident suggested a romance, so the next 
morning I got up early and went out into the garden to 
see if anything interesting was happening. Yes, I 
could hear, soft vet distinct in the summer morning, 
the sound of voices from behind the house. 

" Mawnim, Aliss Di." 

" Ain'ty now, Buh Prince, wha you de do yah now?" 

" Aliss Di, is you ebber see a donkey ? I done see 
one yistiddy." 

" Eh, wha 'e de look like? Wha 'pearance hab e? " 

" Miss Di, he look jist like a mule, on'v mo' so." 



86 



This was the conversation, not very romantic in out- 
ward sentiment, truly, but it meant soft words and gal- 
lant speeches to these two old black people. 

Late one afternoon, about a week after this, my aunt 
and I, walking on the bluff in front of the house, saw 
a dark, bent old figure rowing away " into the glory of 
the sunset." The sound of the rhythmic strokes of the 
oars drifted across the water to us, and every now and 
then we thought we heard a feeble note of a song. 
That evening we saw Daddy Prince return in the 
moonlight, land, and carefully carry a bag of shells to 
the kitchen. The next morning Mum Di told us how 
" splaindid and putty," the graves of her two husbands 
looked, all covered over with shells. 

But in this case, as in all others the course of true 
love did not run smooth, for Daddy Prince was " tuk 
sick." We did all we could for the old man, but he 
was too feeble to fight his disease, and he died. We 
hated to see him go, for he had been in the family all 



his life, but what a " fine old sittin'-up " the negroes 
had over his body, and wdiat unearthly shrieks did we 
hear issuing from the quarters all night long. 

The evening after the funeral, Mum Di appeared at 
the foot of the front piazza steps — a thing unprece- 
dented for her — and we were preparing to sympathize 
with her, when in a most cheerful and gay tone of 
voice she began : " Oh, Missus, I tell you wat, dat 
been one fine funeral. I been chief mourner, and dey 
been six cyart and t'ree buggy dere." 

Then ensued a detailed account of the affair, all told 
in a joyous manner. 

The next day, after much discussion as to whether it 
would make Mum Di feel badly or not to have the 
watermelon sent out, we sent it, and at dinner, when 
we saw her feeding it piece by piece to her ducks, we 
wondered if there was not some real sorrow way down 
in the bottom of that old black heart. 

S. M. T.. 'oq 




87 



ILesfeiads ©f ttlh\e Old N©iKtIh\ Msxte 



A Visit to Miss Taylor, Who Set "The Old North State" to Music 



^Zi N all ages, song has roused people to brave or 
II patriotic deeds, and even in our own day our 
*—* national songs kindle enthusiasm and love of 
country in us. 

The authors and composers who have made such 
gifts to the world indeed deserve our admiration and 
love. It is seldom, however, that we meet such people, 
and when we do, we can not help feeling that we are 
honored by contact with them. 

A short time ago, a friend took me to see Miss 
Louisa Taylor, the charming woman that set " The 
Old North State " to music. 

When we reached her home, in the central part ol 
Raleigh, we found it to be a typical old Southern house 
— a rambling wooden building with an upper and a 
lower piazza. In one corner of the front yard is a tiny 
house which was once Judge Gaston's office. 

After asking to see Miss Taylor, we were shown to 
her room. There, on account of ill-health, she has 
been confined for about twenty-five vears. 



Hut her invalidism has not made her less cheerful. 
Any one would be attracted by her sweet, intellectual 
face and her gracious manners. 

In a few minutes, the conversation turned to the sub- 
ject of Judge Gaston, and Miss Taylor told us how he 
happened to write the State song of North Carolina. 

" I think it was in the vear 1840 that one night I 
went to hear a company of bell-ringers." said Miss 
Taylor. " Between the pieces, there were songs sung 
in the Tyrolese language. I have always had a good 
ear for music, and the next morning, I played on the 
piano one of these pieces. Mother said to Judge Gas- 
ton. ' Uncle, what a stirring air that would be for a 
national song! ' ' I believe I '11 try one.' he answered. 
He went to his office, and in a little while returned 
with the first verse of ' The Old North State.' It 
suited the music exactly. I think he wrote the other 
verses the same day." 

We asked Miss Taylor if the song is still set to the 
music as she remembered it. She answered that a 



friend afterwards gave her a copy of the notes used 
by the Tyrolese, and she found she had played it by 
ear without a mistake. 

" But," she said, " it is not sung quite correctly now ; 
the end of the refrain should go down instead of up." 
Then she showed us the difference, singing in her 
sweet voice, 



Carolina! Carolina! Heaven's blessings attend her ! 
While we live we will cherish, protect, and defend her. 
Though the scorner may sneer at, and witlings defame her, 
Yet our hearts swell with gladness whenever we name her. 
Hurrah! H.rrahl The Old North State forever ! 
Hurrah ! Hurrah ! The good Old North State ! 



Perhaps my story should end here, but I think it 
would hardly be complete without allowing my readers 
a glimpse of Miss Taylor's room. It is like a bit of 
the past. The old-fashioned furniture, the ornaments, 
and the little pictures suggest the days " before the 
war." There are rare flowers everywhere. In all the 
years spent in that room, Miss Taylor says that she has 
never been a day without flowers. 

She told us that Judge Gaston had once lived with 
her family in that very house, which, by the way, was 
built in 1780. 

She spoke of her mother, who, after her husband's 
death, taught a preparatory school, long celebrated in 
Raleigh. Many of those wdio received their early edu- 



cation from her, are living in Raleigh to-day, our best- 
known and most highly honored men and women. 

Miss Taylor herself is cultured and brilliant. She 
keeps pace with modern ideas, and talks most delight- 
fully on all the topics of the day. Although her talents 
and her distinguished ancestry entitle her to member- 
ship in any of the literary and patriotic associations 
of the State, she has never joined any woman's club 
or society. Surrounded by her books and her beautiful 
flowers, she finds her greatest pleasure in her home, 
and in the company of her friends. 

Miss Taylor should, and does, hold a warm place in 
the hearts of North Carolinians. If you, who sing 
" The Old North State " so heartily, could know her, 
for you the song would be a greater inspiration than 
ever before. 

S. C. B., '07. 



An Unknown Heroine 

In the spring of 1771, Colonel Graham, the leader 
of the body of men known in North Carolina as the 
Regulators, kissed his little daughter good-bye, and 
with his followers, went away to meet Governor 
Tryon at Alamance. 

Betty, although only fourteen years of age, was as 
true to her country as her father, and inherited his 
brave spirit. All the afternoon she heard the distant 



roar of the guns, and when night was falling, she ran 
out to watch for her father's return. 

Hidden behind a large tree, she saw Tryon and his 
soldiers inarch by, triumphantly carrying with them as 
prisoners many of those who had gone forth in the 
morning to make the stand against oppression. 

Betty's heart leaped with joy when she saw her 
father among the living ; but stood still with fear, when 
she heard some one say, " They will hang at sunrise 
on Tryon's tree." 

She listened attentively to all that was said, and 
learned that the prisoners that night were to be con- 
cealed in an old deserted cabin on Indian Rock. 

Betty had been often to this spot, by the usual way ; 
but she knew there was a narrow path leading to the 
rock, making a short cut, seldom used on account of 
its steepness and roughness. 

She determined to go to the cabin and release her 
father from his prison. 

In the darkness, she slipped out, and slowly climbed 
the rocky hillside. At last, nearly worn out, her clothes 
in rags, and her feet bleeding, she fell against the little 
log-house. 

She remembered having seen her dog, one day, 
emerge from a hole under the hut ; and she began to 



search for the place. She worked quietly and quickly, 
for she knew that the place was well guarded. At last 
she found the hole ; and creeping in, she saw there 
Colonel Graham and three of his neighbors. 

It was short work to point out to them the way of 
escape. Following the little girl, they were descending 
the steep hillside, when the sound of a falling stone 
attracted the attention of the guard. 

Shots were fired and the three men darted away at 
full speed. Colonel Graham, turning to protect his 
child, saw her fall to the ground. Seizing her in his 
arms, he also ran until he reached the cover of the 
woods. There he lay, as long as darkness protected 
him, beside the body of the little maid who had given 
her life for his. Then he was forced to leave her there, 
and flee for his life. We all know of the brave service 
he did his country during the war which followed. 

Betty's body was found the next day and buried ; 
but for years, no one knew why she was there, nor how 
she met her death. On the site of the battle-ground, a 
monument now stands, erected to the memory of the 
dead Regulators : but Betty still remains one of the 
unknown heroines. 

C. H. G., '08. 



90 



Sunning tljr IBlorkaie 



Being asked to write for St. Mary's Muse, 
As a title, a history fact I'll use. 
To some 'twill be new, to others 'tis old — 
'Tis the blockade-runner, Don, so bold. 

With cargo of cotton we left the quay, 

And were cheered by those who had come to see 

The trip begin, which we all knew 

Meant prison for us if we went not through. 



A neat little craft, was this tiny ship ; 
It gave the blockaders many a slip. 
As it steered its course to Bermuda Isles, 
The cruisers chased it for many long miles. 

We stopped at Ft. Fisher, and landed there, 
To look at the sea-line, and find just where 
The Yankee blockaders at anchor lay, 
For we were to pass them 'fore break of day. 



We waited for darkness, and just at ten 

The moon set We soon crossed the bar, and then 

Our good ship's trouble was all afloat, 

We came near fouling the enemy's boat. 



The cruisers were using a rowing barge- 
It was like a bloodhound just set at large 
We could really have split it half in two, 
But 'twas that very thing we did not do. 



When our ship turned westward, we passed them by; 

As we did so, a rocket lit the sky. 

It was answered then by a signal-gun, 

Which meant that a lookout had begun. 

We saw the swift stream from the gulf ahead, 
And straight for the ripple we quickly sped. 
But when in the stream the cruiser did turn, 
We had left them about six miles astern. 



When the dull, foggy morning came quite clear, 
We saw a cruiser, not far — but near. 
As soon as she saw us she gave us chase, 
But she, bad luck, went a much better pace. 

Night came. We stopped. 'Twas the dark of the moon. 
The cruiser gained on us, and passed us soon. 
There we stayed, where we'd given them the slip, 
And prayers of thanks were on every lip. 



Daylight came at last. We went sailing on, 
With only the thoughts of our last long morn. 
There were many runs that this good ship made, 
But these other wild voyages we'll leave unsaid. 

— E. E., 



'09. 



9i 



In the beautiful month of May, 
When all the flowers spring, 

There awakens in my heart 
A love for everything. 

In the beautiful month of May, 
When all the birds do sing, 

I have found you out my heart, 
The desire of my yearning. 

D. M. H. '05 

Translated front, the German of Heine. 



(J2 



His Capttaiimi 9 © Voice 



^^ CJRING the commencement week of one of onr 
1FI Southern colleges, long after midnight, a tired 
^*^ Senior was pacing up and down the hard board 
floor of his little room. He could not sleep, there was 
no use trying, so after reading over his farewell ad- 
dress — he was valedictorian — for the twentieth time he 
flung away his pen in despair and began crossing the 
room in long impatient strides. Before long his eye 
was caught by a little battered graphophone, lying near 
the student's lamp on the rickety old table. 

Now, in the college every Senior had a " rat," or an 
underclassman who waited on him as his slave, and 
when the Seniors left they gave their respective " rats " 
some little thing for a parting gift. The Senior had 
not been able to get the graphophone in his trunks, so 
he decided to give it to his rat. 

Stopping now before it he wound it up and let it 
play " Taps." 'T was the last time he 'd hear it per- 
haps. How he hated to leave the old place, anyway, 
and all the fellows — hang it, and why did they choose 
him to say good-bye ! And then there came another 
thought, last but perhaps not least, there was some- 
body he hated to leave worse than the fellows — the 
little girl on the hill. 



He stood there musing thus until a tap came at the 
door, as if some one wanted to come in, but was afraid 
to. " Come in," the Senior growled, then resumed his 
walk. 

After having kept the intruder patiently waiting on 
the door-sill for ten minutes he faced about. " < )h ! 
it 's you, is it, rat ? And what are you doing up here 
this time of night? Don't you know I '11 report you 

for ," but the sentence was never finished, for the 

Senior's reporting days were over. 

" I just came to say good-bye, Capt'n," the boy said, 
his eyes growing misty. 

"Ah, good-bye 5 — take a chair, rat," Pointinghim 
to a chair opposite his own by the little table, he began 
to pour something from a brown jug into a glass. 
" Have a dope, rat? " he said, passing it across to him ; 
" 't will cheer you up." 

" Xo, thanks, Capt'n, I never drink." This last was 
in an undertone, for he feared the consequences. 

The Senior glanced up in surprise, and there was a 
strange, almost wistful look in his soft brown eyes as 
he said, " Good, keep it up." 

There was a brief silence. The Senior was thinking, 
and every now and then he gave his meerschaum a soft 



93 



pull, thinking, perhaps, of when he, too, was a rat — 
who knows ? 

At length, looking hard at the graphophone, he said, 
" Rat, vou 've been a good rat, and 1 want you to take 
care of the little 'phone for me ; 't isn't much, but I 
loved it. And — and — ," reddening a little, " you can 
take care of the little girl on the hill, too, rat, if you 
want to." 

" I will, Capt'n," the boy answered, taking up the 
big brass toy as tenderly as if it were a child. " I will, 
good-bve, Capt'n, and God bless you.'' It seemed that 



he wanted to say more, but suddenly grasping the 
Senior's hand in a last farewell, he turned and left the 
room. 

One night several weeks later, the little rat's house- 
hold were very much surprised to be waked up about 
midnight by the sound of a squeaky graphophone play- 
ing " Taps." The rat's mother on going to investigate 
found the boy with his head buried in the pillows and 
crying as if his heart would break. " I can't help it, 
mother, it 's my Capt'n's voice." 

A. W. S. 




94 



Tlie Day of His Stuccesss 



*!i N a cheap room on the fifth floor of a New York 
^1 boarding-house there stood a fragile little 
*—* woman. Her beautiful auburn hair seemed al- 
most too heavy for her small well-shaped head, and her 
glorious dark eyes accentuated the paleness of her face. 

She stood at the window, looking out over the sea of 
roofs and chimneys with unseeing eyes, for snuggled 
under her chin was a beautiful old violin — a Cremona 
— and its deep, rich tones filled the bare little room 
with great heart-throbs. 

Suddenly the music ceased. Burning tears welled 
up in her eyes, and rolled down her cheeks unheeded. 

" I can't give you up — I love you so! Love? Yes, 
but I love him, too." 

She thought of her husband, pale from overwork, his 
broad shoulders bent under the burden of care and 
debt. If his last manuscript should be returned what 
would they do, friendless in New York? 

" I can't think with you in my arms, my violin," she 
whispered, laying it within its silken wrappings. " If 
there were only some other way ! But I saw the hurt 
in his eyes when I begged him to let me work and help 
until success comes. Surely it must come some day — 
but the waiting is so long! " 



She closed the violin case with decisive snap. 
" This is the only way," she said, her quivering lips 
settling themselves in a stern straight line. 

It was twilight, and she stood again by the window, 
a roll of money clasped tightly in her hand. He was 
coming. She stepped forward eagerly to meet him. 
He rushed boyishly into the room, and took her into 
his arms. 

" I have a great piece of news for you, little woman ! 
Can't you guess what it is? " he cried joyfully. " Why 
you haven't congratulated the successful author ! " 

" Get the fiddle, little girl, and play the jolliest tune 
you know, and — are you ill, Margaret? What has 
happened? " 

Her face was drawn and white, and her eyes dull 
with pain. Tremblingly she stretched out her hand and 
gave him the money — her useless sacrifice. 

Understanding flashed over him, and the infinite 
tenderness and sympathy which leaped into his eyes 
opened the flood-gates of her grief. She buried her 
face in her hands, her tender frame shaking with pas- 
sionate sobs. 

" My violin — my lost violin." 

F. H. J. 



95 



Commm'Mc&ttiiinisji wMIh Sters 



PROFESSOR HAYES had been living in Bladen 
only since the spring of 1905, and he had been 
so wrapped up in his scientific experiments that 
the people of the little village hardly knew him at all, 
and generally ridiculed him. 

" He 's nothing but a conceited, stuck-up old crank," 
said one young feminine critic of the village. " He 
stays up there on top of his house gazing at the stars 
through that ridiculous machine of his until his eyes 
are so dazed I suppose, that he can't see us, his fellow- 
creatures. I think it 's a pity he couldn't turn his ma- 
chine downward towards earth and humanity so we 
would appear a little larger in his sight. But why was 
the stick made so handsome? He is so good-looking! " 

Had she only known it the professor was not " old," 
and neither was he a " stick," but this fact was yet to 
be discovered. 

One day the professor was out star-gazing when 
Elizabeth came into his path and — well, the professor 
didn't star-gaze any more, at least he began gazing at 
what, in his estimation was only another kind of a star. 
After this the professor began to think his new dis- 
covery a very important subject of investigation and 



finally even went to the extent of watching it for 
several hours every day. He loved to see the changes 
which it underwent from twinkling merriment to 
thoughtful seriousness, and to make observations upon 
the causes and effects of these changes. As for the 
discovery — strange to say she did not seem to mind 
being watched but even appeared to enjoy it, and one 
day when the professor asked her a question she said 
" Yes ! " 

It was a very curious question for a scientist to make 
of his discovery but the professor was an original man 
in science anyway. 

After they had talked it over for a long time, for it 
was a question which seemed to need a great deal of 
discussion, the professor told her that he had decided 
to take a trip to Mars. She, of course, greeted this dec- 
laration with derision, but after he had given her a 
learned explanation of the state of Mars as compared 
with this world and of how he could take a treatment 
that would adapt him to the condition of that far-away 
world she was almost convinced. 

" But how are you going to get there? " she ques- 
tioned. 



96 



" Oh, that will be easily done," was the reply, " the 
flying machines of this day and time can travel, you 
know, countless miles without any difficulty, so that 
objection is not to be thought of." 

But there was one thing he could not deny and that 
was the danger of it. This was sufficient for " the 
discovery," and she became violently opposed to it. 
But the professor was equally determined, and as 
matters ended he was left to understand that he must 

choose between Mars and " the discovery." Poor 

professor ! No one ever was more in love with a dis- 
covery than was he. But no one ever had a more im- 
portant mission to fulfil. Being the foremost man of 
his country in science, he was best fitted for the work 
he wanted to undertake. For days he was torn be- 
tween the conflicting emotions, his love for science and 
his love for " the discovery." 

Months passed, and the professor, who had at last 
decided to take the trip, was growing thin and ema- 
ciated under his self-treatment. But he prided himself 
on being able to live in what was almost vacuum and to 
go for days without water. This was necessary, he 
said, for on Mars there is very little air and at times no 
water. He had also not been able to see " the dis- 
covery " since his decision, but this of course had 
nothing to do with his bad looks. 

At last one night the professor found himself on the 
way to the longed-for planet. His trip had been very 



successful so far, and had been no rougher than he had 
expected. Inside his well-built airship he was per- 
fectly protected from outside changes and storms, and, 
as he neared the planet, his emotions were indescrib- 
able. Strange to say, what he seemed to fear most was 
the inhabitants. That there were such on the planet, 
there was now no doubt to him, for he could see clear 
signs of them. What if they were barbarians and 
would be afraid of him ? The probable consequences 
of this he was trying to decide when suddenly he heard 
what seemed to him a great explosion and then he 
lost consciousness. After what seemed ages he seemed 
to hear voices iar off. Presently an instrument of 
some kind was put to his ear and then he heard dis- 
tinctly a voice saying, " Parlez-vous francais? " 

Although he knew that language he did not fee] that 
he could speak it at such a time so he tried to shake his 
head. Somehow it wouldn't shake, but his questioner 
seemed to understand. 

" Then you speak English ? " said the voice. 

This time he managed to say yes, but it was with 
an effort. His curiosity was almost overcoming him 
but try as he might, it seemed he could not get his eyes 
open. While he was struggling the voice began again. 

" We the inhabitants of Mars wish to congratulate 
you on your safe arrival and to welcome you to this our 
planet. We have watched your journey from begin- 
ning to end with widespread interest." 



<37 



" But how could you see me, how do you know my 
language? I thought I was on the planet of Mars! " 
was the professor's rather dazed reply. 

" And so you are, but you must understand that we 
are not quite as far behind in science and civilization as 
the people of your world. Our knowledge of your 
history begins with the expulsion of Adam and Eve 
from the garden of Eden, for then it was our instru- 
ments were invented." 

" Why then," gasped the horrified professor, " if you 
were so superhumanly wise, have you not made your- 
self known to us? " 

" Because " replied the voice " we understand that 
it is not intended for worlds to communicate with each 
other. It is against our belief, and ought to be against 
yours." 



Just then the professor's eyes opened and he saw — - 
not Mars, but his own fire. 

Some time after this, one gossip of the village was 
heard to ask another this question, " Say, do you know 
why Professor Hayes gave up bis trip to Mars?" 
" Oh, he says he had a dream that made him see it was 
wrong to attempt it." 

" Bosh," said the other, " more likely he dreamed he 
fell down and broke his crown." 

Whatever reason the villagers gave or whatever 
reason the professor gave himself for his strange ac- 
tion, there was one person who thought she knew, and 
it wasn't long before the professor found himself, 
reallv this time, communicating with another star ! 

L. R. T., '05. 




A Waimftes K.osraaimc<i 



Once a little snow-man 
Lived beneath a tree; 

A single little, solemn little, 
Silent man was he. 



He 'd never seen the sunshine. 
Nor felt the kindly dew; 

Yet just beside him in the cold 
A dainty snowdrop grew. 



She did not seem to fear him; 

Grew nearer every day; 
Her purity and beauty sweet 

Just stole his heart away. 



But she had heard from mother earth 

Of butterflies and spring, 
And when the snow-man told his love, 

She answered not a thing. 



And then he bent to whisper low, 
But she did say him nay, 

And- the little love-sick snow-man 
Melted quite away. 

M. DuB. 05. 



99 




iHilniiii anh tlr Menu 



Milady looked fo beautiful 
He had to tell her fo ; 

He alfo told her (omelhing elfe. 
Ye very gl!ant Beau. 



Milady's voice was very fweet, 
Milady's voice was low, 

Milady never fang alone 
But always with her Beau. 



They fang together in ye dufk. 

After ye funfet's glow. 
And both their hearts were full cf love, 
Milady and her Beau. 

Milady did not anfwer yes, 
Nor did fhe tell him no, 
F'r Milady was a violin 
And he — was juft a bow. 

M. Du B., '05. 





>eptteinnilber 



On the 15th of September, 1904, the sixtv-second 
year ot St. Marv's School was form- 
ally begun. Every girl who has 
ever experienced boarding-school 
life knows what these first few 
weeks mean — for the old girls, 
meeting old friends, missing absent 
friends, and making new friends; 
for the new ones a feeling of home- 
sickness and loneliness mixed with 
a thrilling sense of novelty. And, 
too, so much real work has to be 
done. There are the rooms to be 
gotten in order, pictures hung, cosv 
corners made, trunks unpacked, 
and all arrangements completed for 




settling down to a long winter 's work. Perhaps 
getting satisfactory schedules is the most difficult 
work for both teachers and 
pupils. 

The first Saturday night the 
school welcomed the students, 
both old and new, at an informal 
reception, thus beginning 
along with the school work 
that pleasant social life which 
is so interwoven with our 
less appreciated duties. 

This year has been much like 
ot her years, only, as in every 
thing, in some respects, "the old order is chang- 
ing, giving way unto the new." 




October 



The most enjoyable musical given during the 
year was the Teachers ' Recital in October. We 
already knew how to appreciate the music of most of 
the teachers, and were glad 
to find in the new ones the 
same talent and ability. 





\lfcffHk i This was practically the 

/ ^^" . , beginning of the musical 
year and has been followed 
by many creditable performances by the pupils. 

On the 8th the -'. -(. Literary 
Society gave a reception in honor 
of its new members. 

From the 17th to the 21st the 
annual State Fair was in full 
swing, and how we did enjoy watch- 



ing the crowds pass, and also the Fair itself! Of 
course, there were only the Ferris-wheels, flying 
ladies, fat men. races, confetti, and come-back balls, 

etc., attendant upon every fair, 
J but nothing makes very much 

difference to school girls out 






on a frolic. One of 

the best things about 

the Fair is that it 

brings so many friends and relatives of the girls to 
Raleigh. 

We closed the month with a Hal- 
low e'en party, which in the 
variety of fancy costumes and of 
amusements was more pleasant 
than that of any preceding year. 



Novemalbes 



November began with 
the Tau Delta german 
which, with its chrysan- 
themum decorations, score- 
cards, and quaintly-dress- 
ed clirvs a n t h e- 
mum waitresses, 
was truly typical 
of the season. 

November was 
the beginning of 
both 'the chapter 
entertainments and the senior receptions. 
St. Catherine's Chapter presented "Scenes 
from Dickens," and the farce, "Six to One." 
and St. Etheldreda' s Chapter reproduced 
the great State Fair in miniature. 

Margaret Du Bose gave the first senior 
reception on the 19th, and taxed our brains 





to write poems, and 
while we are not aspir- 
ing to be poetesses, we 
feel quite proud of the 
results of our efforts. 
An exciting 
time in No- 
v e mber was 
when the cir- 
cus " came to 
town." Even 

if we were not allowed to go, it was great fun 
to watcli the processions, and to see as far as 
possible what was taking place on Cameron 
Field. 

Then Thanksgiving — box after box, and 
feast after feast — a holiday — and, we hope, 
with these, some real sense ot the mean- 
ing of the dav. 




104 



)ec©inni IbeF 



T, 







the holidays began, we 
managed to accomplish a 
great deal of work of every 
kind. 

On the night of the ioth 
the L'Etoile German Club 
gave its first dance — a real 
Christmas dance with a 
Santa Claus to take the 
favors from a big Christ- 
mas tree, and give them to 
the Christmas 
fairies to pass 



played " A Case of Suspension," both Chapters show- 
ing ability and training. 
No one can estimate 
the amount of sewing 
done during those Dec- 
ember weeks. Every 
minute that could be 
spared from school- work 
was spent in making 
Christmas presents, and 
gift after gift, the work 



of 




on to the girls. 

The Chapters were active also. St. 
Anne's very charminglv presented " The 
Quintette " from " Florodora," arid "The 
Ruggles' Dinner-party " from " The Birds' 
Christmas Carol," while St. Margaret's 




o v i n g fingers, wasl| 
prepared for 
friends at 
school and home. 

On the evening of the 2 2d and the 
morning of the 23d the girls, full of hap- 
piness and unsuppressed excitement, left 
for their homes, bidding the unfortunates 
left at St. Mary's, a verv Merry Christmas. 



Janmaary 




Alas! January was a 
month made up chiefly of 
sighs and tears. Naturally, 
after the gay Christmas hol- 
idays the contrast with the 
first few school-days made 
one homesick. And then 
the mid-winter examinations 
— " ay, those are the times 
that try men's souls." 

But why not, instead of dwelling on these gloomy 
days, let us tell about the social events 
which manage to exist in spite of every- 
thing? Perhaps the Seniors were work- 
ing unusually hard and needed recreation, 
for Bessie Poe Law entertained the Class 
on the 17th, and required of us the almost 
impossible task of guessing the wiles and r. >, • 




methods of Cupid. Again, 
on the 28th, the Juniors 
entertained the Seniors, 
and made us quite forget 
how ancient and dignified 
we were getting in our ef- 
forts to illustrate nursery 
rhymes. On the 26th Em- 
mie Drewry gave a dinner 
partv at her home in the 
city to the Kappa Delta 
Sorority. 

In January we 
al treat, that of 




had one quite unusu- 
going to the theatre 



to see " The Girl from Kay's," the only 
entertainment of its kind we went to dur- 
ing the year. 



106 



ETelbrumfy 




A snow-storm 
greeted the first of 
February, and gave 
the girls a chance 
for a great deal of 
out-door fun. 

Indoors we had a 
verv delightful time 
also. On the ist 
the school enter- 
tained the members of the Legislature and the Gover- 
nor and his Staff at a musical and reception. On 
the nth, Anna and Rena Clark, Ida Evans 
and Mary Rossell entertained the Senior Class 
at a Millinery Party, in their private sitting- 
room, "Poverty Inn." And the Seniors were 
again in society on the iSth when Sadie Jen- 
kins and Effie Fairley gave a delightful "trip 
to the sea," or, at least, they made you think 





you were at the sea. 

Two important numbers of 
the musical programme took 
place in February when Mat- 
tie Hunter gave her recital 
and when Mr. Edward Bax- 
ter Perry, the well-known 
pianist visited St. Mary's. 

Gen. Fitzhugh Lee was an- 
other noted guest at St. Ma- 
ry's during February, and 

was enthusiastically welcomed by all these loyal- 
hearted Southerners. 
On the 13th the Alpha Kappa Psi Sorority 
gave its annual banquet, which, in everv way, 
proved itself a great success. 

Just one more event of importance — the visit 
of Cupid on St. Valentine's day with his great 
number of heart-shaped greetings. 



107 



Marclhi 




lightful Bal Poudre. As 
get warmer, great inter- 
est in athletics, especially 
basket-ball , was aroused , 
and every day the field 
was the scene of a con- 
test between the Olym- 
pics and Corinthians, 
practising for the match 
game, which was played 
the first of April. 



The first few days of 
March were busily filled, 
in order to finish all social 
duties before the Lenten 
seasonbegan. On the 4th, 
St. Elizabeth's Chapter 
presented the " Fortunes 
of War" — the last of the 
Chapter entertainments. 
And on the sixth the Tau 
Delta German Club gave 
its spring german — a de- 
the days were beginning to 





Dr. Smith, of Chapel H 
and by Prof. Sledd, of 

as a Field for the 
Poet." 

The 8th was Ash 
Wednesday, and 
with little diver- 
sion the Lenten 
days slipped quiet- 
ly into April. 



The lecture course, 
which had been begun 
in February, bv Prof. 
Mims, of Trinity College, 
in a lecture on "Brown- 
ing," was further devel- 
oped during March by 
Dr. Royster on " Physi- 
cal Life;" Dr. Smith, of 
Davidson, on " The Life 
and Death of a World;" 
on "Southern Literature;" 
Wake Forest, on " The South 




108 



April 




Until Easter, the 23d, 
was almost a repetition of 
March. Except that 
every day as the spring 
advanced, the grove at 
St. Mary's grew more 
beautiful, and, even if it 
was Lent, the weather 
just made one think of 
picnics and all kinds of 
outdoor amusements. 
There was no real so- 
cial life before Easter, of course, but all during Lent 

the music pupils tried to muster 

courage for public performances 

for Commencement by giving 

numerous " social evenings " and 

public recitals. The Certificate 

Recital given the last of March 




was one of the chief musical 
events of the year. 

The Sigma Lambda and Ep- 
silon Alpha Pi Literary Socie- 
ties claimed the night of the 
twenty-sixth for their annual 
" war of words," which cov- 
ered both sides with glorv. On 
the twenty-ninth Florence Grant 
and Mossie Long gave a recep- 
tion in honor of the Seniors, 
and proved themselves delight- 
ful hostesses. 

Commencement excitement 
was already beginning to dis- 
turb the atmosphere, and look- 
ing forward with pleasure to 
that important week, we left 
April and welcomed May. 




109 




Mav really belongs 
to the Seniors, so what 
better way for them to 
have begun it than by 
Dorothy Hughson and 
Ellen Gibson's May- 
day partv? Events 
followed so rapidly 
that it is almost im- 



possible to mention them all. 

The Sororities were especially 
prominent. On the 13th the Kappa 
Deltas gave their annual banquet, 
that of the Upsilon Deltas followed 
soon after, and the Gamma Beta 




Sigmas entertained 
during Commence- 
ment week, as is 
their custom. Also 
during Commence- 
ment week the 
L'Etoile German 



Club gave a morning 
german — the last time 
that many of us will 
ever dance as men. 

Excitement and 
pleasure and the sor- 
row of parting always 
make up Commence- 
ment week. We feel 
that 





we may never see many of our friends 
again, and that we leave a place at St_ 
Mary's so easily filled. But we real- 
ize that it has been soeverv vear, and 
will always be so, and when on May 
25th we heard the multitude cry: 



" The Seniors are 
dead ! Long live the 
Seniors!" theclassof 
1905 took its place 
among the post- 
graduates and greet- 
ed the class of iqo6. 




Tlhe Svy Miaows A Few Tlhiir&jg»s Afocmt ftlhe a ° JEasfe !R.©cI&e2=§ ' 



^itOR nearly fifty years I have stuck to East Rock 
*%[] through rain and sunshine — summer and 
*** winter. In spite of all of these winters, I still 
look and feel just as young and fresh as ever — this 
close intimacy with the girls who come and go each 
year must keep me so. They always leave me much to 
think about during the long summer days, when they 
have gone, but the marvelous things which I have 
heard this year, will furnish material for meditation 
for years to come. The happening at Windsor, the 
dividing of one beaten biscuit among fifteen, the 
wonderful music that can be laboriously extracted from 
a mandolin, are but minor details. How such — but 
what 's the excitement in that room ? 

Gertrude W. ( excitedly ) : " Oh ! Alice, I 've lost 
another ' frat ' pin." 

Alice (indifferently) : " Well, Trudie it 's just your 
luck." (Whistles " 'T is not the first time — nor yet 
the last time.") 

Olive ( piously ) : " Get your candle and search 
diligently till you find it." " What are you looking so 
blue about, Eldridge?" 

Eldridge (sadly) : " Well, I got letters from Mama, 
Papa, Mary. Lucie, Tom, Dick, and Harry, but I 
wanted another." 

Chris.: That's not anything to be sad about, 
why think about me. My brother won't even give me 



a Sigma Lambda pin, when he hasn't sent me a thing 
but a watch and seven pounds of Alligretti's this week! 
Say, Bets, come on in here with us." 

Bettie (from next room) : " I '11 be there in a few 
minutes, but must straighten up first." 

Alice (emphatically): "Joe, I ask you as a per- 
sonal favor not to drink out of my pitcher again." 

Joe (with head still in the pitcher) : " That 's not 
anything new." 

Susie (disgusted): "Joe, that's most as bad as 
chewing gum." 

Mary V. (poking her head in the door) : 
should the tion hook in stenograph)' be on the 
hand or on the left-hand side of the consonant ? ' 

Blandina : " Oh, I 've got the " 

Nell D. (rushing madly up the hall, crying) : 
you haven't, for I bid for it last night." 

Olive : " Blessed are the peacemakers." 

Emily C. (reprovingly): "Why, Olive! You are 
so sarcastic." 

Marguerite: "Oh, I forgot to tell you girls, when 
I got to Washington " 

If the sentence was finished it was to a vacant room 
for the only sound I hear is of footsteps hurrying 
down the hall. I could tell you lots of things but as I 
am the ivy on the wall, I don't think it would be quite 
fair. 



' Alice, 
right- 



No 



Due 



•^■r HERE was once a Farmer who had A. Lamb. 
Lfl He was afraid that it would be eaten up by a 
^■^ ( Irav Woolf that came very often to drink from 
the Springs and Wells on the place. 

He also had two daughters, Mattie and Marguerite. 
Now, Marguerite was a good Walker, but she got lost 
in the Ellen-wood one day, so the Farmer said to his 



other daughter, " Mattie, Hunter." She took so Long 
to go that he said, " Oh, I can wait no Moore. Let me 
get my ploughs, for the Tillingbast to be done. When 
I send my Corn(ey) to A. Miller's, I will tell my Car- 
ter to look for her." 

No Prince could be Serena than that Farmer. 



A(ny) B(ody) C? 



Some say we're not so big as we think, 
E,ven if we do use so much paper and ink. 
No two years will find us exactly the same — 
I'm sure you will tremble with fear at our name! 
Others may scoff, but of course you will see 
Right away, how very important are we. 
St. Mary's never without us may be. 

Why is Helen Strange? 

Why is Lillian Savage ? 

Why does Mossie Long for home? 

Why is Lottie Sharpe? 

Why is Marguerite Short? 

When do 23 Florrie Grant you grace? 

When does Spruill make you ill? 

When you take away the first three letters. 
What comes with winter? Cowles. C ? 
What did Katie Loane? 
What did Rena C ? 
What dance do the Wilmington girls like best? 

J. I. G, 



What is the synonym for Isabel? 

Isabel Means Ruff. 
What does the rising bell say to Sadie ? 

"Up Jenkins." 
Who can Fairley C? 

She was walking in the grove. Why didn't Lula 
Joyner? 

Be your own Frank Self. 
Don't be blue, B. Gray. 

St. Mary's must be a very large place, it con- 
tains two Seays. 

How does the Main Building differ from other 
houses? 

It has two Ruffs. 
What is the proverbial hiding-place for a needle? 

A. Stack. 
What teacher could best give "the Stone-y Stare ' ' ? 
What member of the Faculty can best sail into 
you ? 



"3 



KNDCK5 




I am reckless what I do to spite the world. — B. Gray. 

Solemn and silent everywhere. — A. Stuck. 

He had a head to contrive, a tongue to persuade, and 
a hand to execute any mischief. — /. Clark and Helen 
Strange. 

Actresses will happen in the best-regulated families. 
— /. Carson. 

Heard melodies are sweet. 

But those unheard are sweeter. 

— D. Hughson's guitar. 



U3REWBVJ 



This is the very ecstacv of love. — V. Glasebrook and 

F. Kidder. 

And on a sudden, fainting with surprise. — A". Ed- 

munston. 

A little more sleep, and a little more slumber. — R. 

Clark. 

I would not spend another such night. 
Though 't were to bring a world of happy days, 
So full of dismal terror was the time. 

—Public Recitals. 



114 



Speak freely what you think. — 5". Byiiiuu. 

In faith, he is a worthy gentleman, 

Exceedingly well-read. — Mr. Stone. 

The sun upon a mountain's head, 

A freshening luster mellow. — M. E. George. 

Two friends, though diversely inclined. — /. Ei'aiis 
and M. Rosscll. 

A six-vear's darling, of a pigmy size. — 5". Carter. 

Oh ! for a draught of vintage. — R. Clark and E. Gib- 
son. 

Why linger, why turn back, why shrink my heart? — 
Goat-night. 

She did really bristle with moral excellencies. — 5. 
Bailey. 

Good dressing, quiet ways, low tones of voice, lips 
that can wait. — St. Mary's Girls. 

Everv one has a romance in his own heart. — K. 
Glazebrook and S. Thorn. 

For gossip lives upon succession, 

Forever housed when it gets possession. 

West Roek. 



Pleasant company always accepted. — " Poverty Inn." 
We never fail, there is no such word in our dic- 
tionary. — D. Seience Class. 

" Give me a theme," the weary senior cried, 

I'll do my part. 
" You'd need no theme," the world replied, 
" If you were smart." 

And give us stones for bread. — Monday Morning 
Biscuit. 

Then methought the air grew denser, 

Perfumed from an unseen censer. 

— Onion Feast. 

Dream-like, in fitful murmurous sighs. — M. Springs 
Auditors. 

His laugh that set the chandelier drops ringing over 
head. — A. Spruill. 

Oh, how this discord doth afflict my soul. — Practice 
Rooms. 

A fine little fellow, honest, intelligent and kind. — 
E. Gibson. 



115 



Board of BLdlitoir^ 



Anna Barrow Clark . . Editor-in-Chief 

Mary Ellis Rossell Business Manager 

Ren a Hoyt Clark Assistant Business Manager 

Margaret Rosalie DuBose / Dorothy May Hughsox ) r-,-. , . 

I r; , uj-*„ [ Editors on Advertisements 

> Literary Editors t ttju in , <■ 

c tit t . ». ( c- ti r> \ Editors on Illustrations 

Sadie Marcelline Jenkins ) Ellen Phifer Gibson ) 

Ida Pollard Evans 

Florence Lawton Grant | 

Mossie Elizabeth Long [- Associate Editors 

Effie Christian Fairley 

Linda Ray Tillinghast 



116 



m t»?mmt 






When you do dance, I 
wish you a wave o' the 
sea, that you might ever 
do nothing but that. 

T. Boylan. 



On the 

natural, 



stage she was 

simple, affect- 

D. Hughson. 




The glass of fai 
O! she sits high 



hion and the mould of form, 
in all the people's hearts. 

S. Critz. 



118 



None know her but to 

love her, 
None name her but to 

praise. M. Eldridge. 




On every point, in earnest 

or in jest. 
Her judgment, and her 

prudence and her wit 
Were deeni'd the very 

touchstone and the 

test. 
Of what was proper, 

graceful, just and best. 
E. Gibson. 





He is as jolly a good fel- 
low as ever I met. 

A. Spruill. 



There's nothing but 
death our affection can 
sever. E. Croft and E. 
Barnwell. 





Life's not so short, but 
that there is always time 
for courtesy. 

S. Jenkins. 



Conscience is harder 
than our enemies, 

Knows more, accuses 
with more nicety. 

S. Bailey. 




Tis not a lip or eye we beauty call, 
But the full force and joint effect of all. 

C Klingensmith. 



ug 




That unmatched form and 

feature 

V. Bailey 





Night after night 

she sat and bleared her 

eyes with books 

B. Bowen 



So much one man 

can do 
That does both act 

and know 
J. MURCHISON 





She is gifted with genius 
who knows much by natu- 
ral talents 

She's a bonnie wee thing 
She's a winsome wee thing 
S. Carter 



Here's the whole school, for fear some poor damsel will be 

offended 




WILMINGTON CLUB 



r "~ 




SOUTH CAROLINA CLUB 



Tlbe ILaftHl© <§'taire 



We like to go to C rowel l's 

We like to go to King's, 
We like to go 'most everywhere 

And buy all sorts of things. 

But the place you get the best, 
And for the less get more, 

Is not away off down the street, 
But at the " little store." 

Royster's candy's hard to beat, 
And Ciersch's is a dream, 

And we have yet another joy 
In Dughi's "best ice-cream. 



But the dearest and the cheapest 

Is at our very door, 
And it isn't running away to go 

Just down to tlte "little store." 

Rosenthal is another friend. 

And Stronach just below. 
And then there's Bretsch's, too. 

Where we always love to go. 

But 'wherever wc may wander 
We can never, nevermore 

Find quite just such another place 
As our own dear "little store." 
7. E. B., '06. 



BOYLAN, PEARGE & CO. 

206 and 8 Fayetteville St., RALEIGH, N. C. 

The largest retail dry goods dealers in the State. We are never too busy to 
quote prices or submit samples. 

The Spring and Summer stock for 1905 is now at its top notch fulness. 
Excellent showing of: 

SILK, COTTON and LINEN SHIRTWAISTS SILK and COTTON PETTICOATS 

SILK and CLOTH WRAPS, SILK SHIRT-WAIST SUITS 

SEPARATE DRESS SKIRTS NOVELTY ROBE SUITS 

DOMESTIC and FOREIGN MILLINERY DRESS GOODS AMD MILLINERY 

CARPETS, MATTINGS and RUGS NOVELTY SUITINGS AND ROBES 

LACES AND EMBROIDERY CURTAINS AND DRAPERIES 



YOUR INSPECTION SOLICITED 

We Prepay Express Charges on Mail Orders Amounting to $5.00 and Over 



Established 1 Sf>7 

The Students 
and Friends of 
ST. MARY'S 
SCHOOL 




WILL find at our Store the best and 
most complete line of everything 
carried in an up-to-date Book Store. 
HEAD LINES of unequaled papers. 
EASTMAN'S Kodaks and supplies. 
Public High School and College Text 
Books. 

Your patronage solicited. 

Our personal attention to your orders. 



Alfred Williams ®> Co. 

SOUVENIR CARDS OF ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 
And Other Points of Interest in Raleigh 



Dobbin <& pewall 

Sellers of 
the Best 


DRY GOODS 

OF ALL KINDS 


Carpets, Curtains, St-toes 


Our special FREii Delivery Mail Order System is at 
your service. *'\ We prepay express or freight charges anywhere 
in North Carolina on all cash mail orders of $5.00 or more 


We will gladly mail samples of Dress Goods, 

Silks, White Goods, or anything 

that may be sampled. 

WRITE O It ' V H O N E US 

DOBBIN & FERRALL 


1 23 and 125 FayettevilleSt. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 









sftfei 



IPP8 



iiffl 



few*! 



felftll 



M. ROSENTHAL & COMPANY 

(Brocers 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

WE carry only high- 
class goods at very 
low prices and so- 
licit your kind patronage. 



M. ROSENTHAL & COMPANY 

I36 FAYETTEVILLE STREET, RALEIGH, N. C. 



,.•-.■"-,'.,,■■.'■■ ...-.-':' :,-■'-.-■ ':■:■ *..■■• ■■''.'-.■■.. ,•/_>■..-. 

"-."„-;' ■..'-. -.:' '•■-.'■.,•?.,-■ "■, .-7., -;;:. ,.■:,,•;.•-,■"■■'■. v.;"..-..;.,.".,,^, 



... ■ ' ■. ■■■■■ ■ ..■ . ■ ..■ . 




A Great Cook 

GETS GREAT CREDIT 
IF THE COOKING IS 
DONE QUICKLY AND 
ECONOMICALLY. 



GAS 



is the FUEL to USE. Cheap and 
clean, no trouble, no labor. If you 
haven't a GAS RANGE get one . . . 



It vou want a well lit home, 
USE 

WELSBACH LIGHTS 

THEY GIVE MOST 
LIGHT FOR LEAST 
MONEY 

THE NEAREST APPROACH TO 
DAYLIGHT; THEREFORE THE 
BEST 




SAVE YOUR EYES. SAVE YOUR NERVES. 
SAVE YOUR POCKET-BOOKS. 



'PHONES 228. 



STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY, 

J24 FAYETTEVILLE STREET. 



















Directors 

c. m. busbee, 
James a. Briggs 
T. C. Crowder 
Julius Lewis 
Chas. E. Johnson 

F.O. MORING 

Chas. H. Belvin 




The National Bank 
of Raleigh 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital.' ..... $225,000 




Chas. H. Belvin, 

President 

Chas. E. Johnson, 

Vice-President 

F. H. briggs, 

Cashier 

J. B. TlMBERLAKE, 

Teller and Ass't Cashier 






J. W- Harden, Jr. 

* 




Surplus and Profits, . $115,000 

W 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and 
Burglar-Proof Vault for Rent 
at Moderate Cost. Absolutely 
Safe Place For Keeping Val- 
uables of all Kinds ::--.:: : 




♦ 



















«X 
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tx 

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RICHMOND MEAT MARKET 



RICHMOND MEAT MARKET 



J. SCHWARTZ 



:DEALER IN: 



Choice Meats 



SAUSAGE A SPECIALTY 




RALEIGH, N. C. 



P. O. BOX 342 



City Market 



h*a 






r'£7 •£? '£? •£? •<£? •^ 7 •<£? '£? '^7 '<Z7 V? 7 V? 7 '^ '<Z7 '^ V2 7 •£? '£? '^ .^7 .^7 .^7 -^7 -i^g^ 
OUR 

W. C. STRONACH'S SONS CO. 



Scclesiasticai Jtrt 
Vsepartment 



Is superbly equipped for the prompt and proper exe- 
cution of fine Church Work, such as 

Altars, Willi or without {teredos. 

Pulpits, tectums, tJisliou's Chairs, 

Br.iuei' Desks, X, i t a iiij Ocsks, 

Bauu Screens, Onpiisiii.il 

fonts, ana similar 

VuriiisMuns 



WRITE FOR SPECIAL CHURCH FURNITURE CATALOGUE. 



^ 



1 14-1 16-1 18-120-122 BURRELL ST. 

MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN. 



f rocers 



* 




No. 215 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 

RALEIGH. 



\ • ^' ^>' ^ ^' "^' ^' ^- ^- ^« ^' ""Sv ^s« ^' ^' ^ ^ ^' ^- "^' ^« ^5v ^- ^- ^» ^=i" 



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$ 
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We Make Your Shopping With us ■' pleas- 
ant" as Well as " PROFITABLE." 



fl. 6. Stronacb Co. 



OUTFITTERS FOR. 



Ladies, Misses and Children. Com- 
mencement Dress Materials and Ac- 
cessories such as Ribbons, Laces and 
Embroideries, Gloves, Fans, Hosiery, 
etc., receive our special attention. : 
Ladies' and Misses' Fine Shoes. The 
Best Fitting, Best Wearing and Best 
Values. Manufactured expressly for 
us. You pay for the Shoes and not 
for the name. ::::-::■.:■.::::; 



jf. S$. Otronach, 

2J5 Fayetteville to 216 Wilmington Streets, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



/♦s 

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Sheiwood Higgs & Co. Sherwood Higgs & Co. 

Raleigh's Only Department 
...Store. . 

Sr. Mary's Steel Die stationery 
St. Mary's School Souvenir Postal Cards 

Largest Millinery and Ladies 
Ready-to-Wear Department in the State 

MODERN STORE SERVICEand EQUIPMENT 

Trust-worthy goods only, at uni- 
formly right prices. 

All articles guaranteed as repre- 
sented. 

One price to all and that the lowest. 

Money refunded to all dissatisfied 
buyers. 

Courteous treatment to all. 

Experienced salespeople in every 
Department. 

Buying in large quantities and direct, 
saves for you the middleman's profit. 

YOU'LL FIND THE STORE AS GOOD AS 
ADVERTISED. 

Sherwood Higgs h Co. 



■"C->C-'C- > C-C- , C-'C- , C- > C-C-C- , C' , C- , C-'C-<->C- , >5- 



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155 



^^B^S^ia^fB^B^lB^B^S^J3^5^B^fB^6^iS^6^6^6S^S^ 



HAVE YOUR PICTURES 
MADE BY 

WttdRTON 

Raleigh's High-Class 

Pbotograpber 




Remember it pays to get the best 

STUDIO: 
119 l /z Fayetteville Street 




North Star 
Refrigerators 



Ice-Cream Freezers, Cook Stoves, Ranges, Heating Stoves 
for wood or coal, Furnaces, Paint for houses. Stains for floors, 
Enamels for bath tubs, Hard Oils for floors, Johnson Floor 
Wax, Floor Restorers, Screen Doors and Windows, Poultry 
Netting, Scissors, Razors, Knives and Forks, Carvers. 

MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 
MONEY BACK IF NOT SUITED 

Hart-Ward Hardcjuare Co. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



■HHBSHBHSSHHBHHHHSHHH 



^5BS§M@ 



Young & Hughes 

121 Fayetteville St. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 




STEAM and Hot Water Heat- 
ing. Have Florida weather 
all the winter by using a 
steam or hot water system. No 
dust ! No coal gas ! Economy of 
Coal Consumption. Let us make 
you an estimate. ::::::::: 



X *Dughi, 

...DEALER IN... 

Confections and Foreign and Do- 
mestic Fruits. Ice Cream Man- 
ufactured by Electricity. 

J'anct/ Creams a opeciaity 

CATERER FOR 

ll/eddi'ngs, jJanquots, etc. 

Appointments Furnished 
when desired. 

References— MY CUSTOMERS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



SALVATORC DCSIO 

Manufacturing Jeweler 
and Silversmith 




1012 F Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Large Assortment of 

14 k Jewelry- 
Silverware and Silver Novelties 

CLASS PINS A SPECIALTY 



NEW AND IMPORTED NOVELTIES 
FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



io"« Discount Allowed for The Pupils 



GRADUATION 



WITH the Diplomas 
and speeches of grad- 
uation time we have nothing 
to do, but with the gift giving 
part of the program we have. 
Q, We have cases filled with 
the kind of Jewelry that 
makes acceptable presents— 

Watches, Rings and 

TRINKETS OF MANY SORTS 

So if there is a son or daughter, a favored nephew or niece to be 
remembered, we trust you will remember our prepared- 
ness — and likewise, we hope you will bear in 
mind that we are here to serve you to the 
veiy best of our ability. Not 
alone on such special oc- 
casions as we have 
mentioned 
here. 
But At All Times and in Every Way 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

RALEIGH 



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Charles W. Barrett, Architect 

SPECIAL WORK IN FINE 



AUTHOR OF 
'COLONIAL SOUTHERN HOME: 



11554 FAYETTEV1LLE SIREET 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



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i ©T F^TCTTEMIILLE ST., MLE»<GlrL N. C. 




2© F/SIYETTEWI1 LLC STIE1T 



ttflRDEN'S LIYERT 5T71BLE 

CARRIAGES OF EVERY KIND AT EVERY HOUR 
F3R EVERYTHING. DRIVE IN A 

lyPiEl-TD^TO C/rSME 

FROM THE RIGHT PLACE. LOW PRICES. FINE TURNOUTS 

Promptness and Courtesy Paid to All Orders 

'Phone 79 

QEORQE n. HdRbEN 



m. 









Johnson <5 Johnson, 


3. 5. ITlacDonalb (£0. 

DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, WATCHES, 
CLOCKS, SILVERWARE. 

No. 214 North Charles Street, 

Baltimore, 2115. 

CLASS RINGS, MEDALS and BADGES TO 
ORDER. 


Coal, Wood 
and Ice 


122 Fayetteville St., RALEIGH, N. C. 


Insure Against 
Loss by Fire... 

Best Companies Represented. 
Bonding Solicited. 

The Mechanics' Dime 


THE SHONNIGER, 

THE RIGHT PIANO 


at the RIGHT PRICE 

U/£ urge the closest inspection, the strictest compari- 
vv son with any piano sold at the same or even 
higher prices. 

A full line of Guitars, Banjos, Mandolins, Violins, 
and everything kept in a first-class Music Store. 

DARNELL & THOMAS, Raleigh, N. C. 


Savings Bank 


RALEIGH, N. C. 



The operator and manager at 

JDatson & (£o.'s (Ballery 

does work that pleases the people. 
Try him. 



punter 23ros. & 23rerr>er 

LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S 

FINE SHOES & 
OXFORDS 



Up to date 



Fayetteville Street :: RALEIGH, N. C. 



Perry 6c Kosentfyal 

LADIES* FINE 
OXFORDS 



Fayetteville Street :: RALEIGH, N. C. 



We keep the largest stock and most correct styles of 

.SHOEkS 

in Raleigh. 
Don't fail to see them at 

5. £. Pool's 



DIAMONDS, WATCHES and 
SILVERWARE. 

Newest and Richest Designs. 

THE OLDEST HOUSE IN 
...THE STATE... 

H. SILVERTHORN CO., 

917 Main Street :: LYNCHBURG, VA. 

Manufacturers of College Medals, 
Class Rings and Pins. 


Raleigh Iron Works, 

Manufacturers and 
Dealers in . 

Boilers, Engines, Machinery and 
Mill Supplies. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


IF IT IS FURNITURE 
YOU ARE TO BUY 

Please Let us Show You or Write 

Us For Our NEW CATALOGUE 

If We carry the Artistic and plain de- 
signs in all woods ::::::::::: 

Royall & Borden Furniture Co. 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Sts. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


Bretschs' French Bakery 

Assorted Cakes and Bread 
of all Kinds 

Wedding Cakes a Specialty 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


Do You Feel Safe From Fire? 

Lowest Rates and Best Companies 

Guaranteed 

INRURE YOUR LIFE AND PROPERTY WITH 

JOHN C. DREWERY 

220 Fayetteville St. - - RALEIGH, N. C. 



(JOLLY & WYNNE 
JEWELRY COMPANY 







SILVER NOV 


ELTIES 










HOLIDAY ' 


; O D S 








WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY 
S I LV E RWA R E 


AND 






SPEC 


T A C L E S AND 


EYEGLASSES 




R 


•pairingjine watches, jewelry and silverware a specialty 



12S Favetteville Street :: 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE LITTLE STORE" 



has enlarged its ad., why not enlarge your patronage? 



KING'S GSOGESY 

508 Hillsboro Street :: RALEIGH, N. C. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT 

sL L- O'QUINN & GOMPANY 

Leading Florists of North Carolina 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



ANTIGEPHALALGJNE 

The Wonderful Headache Cure 
2^1. AND 50c AT ALL DRUGGISTS 

Raleigh, JAMES I. JOHNSON 



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UZZELL& CO. 
Printers and Binders 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

4* 




F I R 


5 T - C L A S S WORK ONLY 



H. 


STEINMETZ 




J'iort'st 


ROSES 


, CARNATIONS, VIOLETS, WEDDING 




BOOUETS, FLORAL DESIGNS, 




PALMS, FERNS, AND 


ALL KINDS OF PLANTS 




'Phone 113 




yca/eigh, yjorth Carolina 



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GIERSCH'S CAFE 

216 Fayetteville St. 

J rivate ining and 
banquet Snooms 

Cuisine and Service Unexcelled 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

RALEIGH, X. C. 

■hardware, jCawn 9^owers, Z/iefrigerators, 

Jce-Cream freezers, Stoves 

and Ganges 

THE GREAT S. W. P. HOUSE PAINT, FLOOR STAINS, 
WAX, HOUSEHOLD PAINTS 



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Our Soda Water 

IS FAMOUS 

Everything Used in the Making is First Qual- 
ity, Pure and We Serve it Right. 

W. H. KING DRUG COMPANY 

SOLE AGENTS FOR HUYLER'S FINE CANDIES 

Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



V. W. %la/ce 

Fine Watches and Jewelry 
Repairing Promptly Done 



V 



9?ear Alfred Williams d Co. 



Staple and fancy Groceries, 

Fruits, Vegetables and 
Country Produce. 

The Best of Everything of its Kind and at 

ROCK BOTTOM PRICES. 
We Make Special Prices to Schools and Colleges. 

D. C. riobnstoii ss Son, 

163 Hargett Street, - RALEIGH, N. C. 
'Phone No. rS. 

Ellington 's Jxrt Store, 



Everything for the Needle as Weil as the 
Brush. Art Embroidery Materials. Wools 
and Zephyrs. College and Fraternity Pil- 
low Tops and Flags. Everything in Art. 
More Aid Solicited . 



112 Fayetteville St., RALEIGH, N. 



^V* 



JNO. R. FERRALL JOSHUA K. HILL 

J. R. Ferrali & Co. 
QR0QEK5 



22 FAYET I EVILLB ST. 



BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 



Heller's Shoe 
Store 

FINE LINE OF 

OXFORDS 

SOLE AGENTS OF 

Queon Quality 

tS/ioas 

RALEIGH, N . C. 



W. H. HUGHES 

DEALER IN 

China, Crockery, Glassware, 

Camps, Cable Cutlery. 

Silver -Plated 

Ulare 

Filters, Tea Trays, Oil Stoves, 
Ho usefurnishing Goods 

Agent for 

Odorless Refrigerators 

i 2; Fayetteville Street 



Jno.T. Pullen N. W. West 

Pres. V.-Pres. 

J. O. LlTCHFOKD 

Cashier 

ilnliMtjh S.iomns 
Bank 

RALEIG H, N. C. 

Capital, $15,000 Surplus, $25,000 

Deposits over $600,000 



Four per cent, interest paid on 
deposits 



Candies, Toys, Games, Tab- 
lets, Box Paper 

CHINA 

IN SETS, AND 

Fancy Odd Pieces 

PICTURES, FRAMES, 

MIRRORS, BASKETS, 

OIL STOVES 

The J. D. Riggan 
Company 



INSURE YOUR LIFE 
IN THE 

Penn Mutual Life Insciranee 
Company 

of Philadelphia, Pa. 

The most popular and the most re- 
liable company represented 
in North Carolina. 

R. B. R A N E Y 

General Agent 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

No discrimination against women in 
contracts nor in premium rates. 



Ellington Cumber Go. 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

MANUFACTURERS OF ROUGH 
AND DRESSED 

Long Leaf Lumber 

Shingles and Laths 

Flooring, Ceiling, Weatherboarding, 
Etc., Sash, Doors, Blinds, Window 
and Door Frames, Mouldings, 
Mantels, Turned Work, and all 
kinds of Building Material. 

Write for quotations 

Office and Shop: 120 South West St. 

Raleigh 'Phone 236 

Interstate 332 



JNO. P. HAYES 

Photographer 



KODAK WORK OF ALL 
KINDS 

Pictures at Prices to Please 
From 25c. for 24 to $6.00 per dozen 



124J2 Fayetteville St. 



GRIMES & VASS 

FIRE INSURANCE 
& INVESTMENTS 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



CALIFORNIA FRUIT 
STORE 

GUS VURNAKES & Co,, Profits 

Dealers in 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 
FRUITS : NUTS ' CANDIES 



Fruits, Candies and Cream 
a Specialty 

THREE [PHONES 

133 FAYETTEVILLE STRF.ET 



ROBERT SIMPSON 



DRUGS AND 
PERFUMES 

TOILET 

ARTICLES 

ETC. 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



MISSES REESE S 
COMPANY 

MILLINERY 



10$ OFF TO FACULTY 
AND BOARDING PUPILS 

SPECIAL HATS EVERY 
MONDAY DURING THE 
SEASON FOR SCHOOL 
GIRLS A © fc. A h h H 



10 WEST HARGKTT STREET 



WEATHERS &UTLEY 

DEALERS IK 

PICTURE FRAMES 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

WINDOW SHADES 

AND WALL PAPER 

CURTAIN POLES 
PICTURES, ETC. :: 



DR. V. E. TURNER 

DENTIST 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



EXCELSIOR STEAM 
LAUNDRY 

% 



DOMESTIC OR 
GLOSS FINISH 
AS DESIRED 

FAYETTEVILLE STREET 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 




64th Annual Session 

Opens September 

21st, 1905 

f 

INiqoj-'oj 225 S TU DENTS 

FROM 17 DIOCESES 
25 IN THE FACULTY 


SAINT MARY'S 
SCHOOL 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
For Girls and Young Women 

THE DIOCESAN SCHOOL FOR 
THE CAROLINAS : : : : : : : : : 

For Catalogue Address 

Rev. McNeely Dubose, B.S., 
B.D., Rector. 


ST. MARY'S OFFERS 
. . INSTRUCTIONS IN . . 

1 '. The College 

2. T/ie Music School 

3. The Business School 

4. The Art School 

3. The Preparatory School 

Special Attention to The 
Social and Christian Side 
of Education Without 
Slight to Scholastic 
Training ::::::::::::: 



THIS ANNUAL 

PRINTED BY 

€fjc ..©tone printing & apfg. <£o. 





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